Thursday, September 9, 2010

DESCENDANTS OF FRANCOIS LEBEUF (LEBOEUF) BORN ABOUT 1590

DESCENDANTS OF FRANCOIS LEBEUF

FRANCOIS LEBEUF was born Abt. 1590. He married THERESE INARD Abt. 1612. She was born Abt. 1590.
Child of FRANCOIS LEBEUF and THERESE INARD is:
THOMAS LEBEUF who was born in 1613 in Notre Dame de Giray en Aunis, FR and died December 02, 1663 in Giray en Aunis, FR.

TIMELINE OF FRANCOIS LEBEUF AND THERESE INARD:
1590 Francois was born
1590 Therese INARD was born
1612 Francois married Therese INARD
1613 Son Thomas born in Giray en Aunis, FR

THOMAS LEBEUF, son of Francois Lebeuf and Therese Inard, was born in 1613 in Notre Dame de Giray en Aunis, FR and died December 02, 1663 in Notre Dame de Giray en Aunis, FR. He married NICOLE GAZELLE April 14, 1643 in Giray, Charente, Inferie, FR. She was born in 1617 in Giray, Aunis, FR, and died February 12, 1662/63 in France.
According to records from la Rochelle, FR, the name LEBOEUF started out as LEBEUF, or Le Beuf. (To some, the combined or two part name, capitalized or not, has a specific meaning). Finally, it settled to LEBOEUF or LEBEUF, meaning "The Beef" for a number of years. Modern French shows 'the beef' as LEBOEUF.
Children of THOMAS LEBEUF and NICOLE GAZELLE are:
1. CATHERINE LEBEUF was born in October 1635 in Giray, FR
2. MARGUERITE LEBEUF was born on January 20, 1640 in Giray, FR
3. JACQUES dit BOUTET LEBEUF was born and baptized April 14, 1643 at NotreDame de Gire et Aunis, in Rochefort (The Parish of Our Lady of Rochefort), in the city of LaRochelle, in the Province of Aunis, now the Department of Charnel Maritime on the west coast of France, Carerente-Martim, FR, and died November 28, 1696 in Batiscan, Deschaillions, Champlain, Quebec, CN.
The French-Canadian line came into being with Jacques le Beuf, son of Thomas LEBEUF and Nicole GAZELLE. Jacques married twice and many in the southern United States are his descendents through his second wife, Antoinette LENOIR.
The "dit" names as in Jacques above, have an interesting origin. The English translation of "dit" is "said". The Colonists of Nouvelle France added "dit" names as distinguishers. A settler might have wanted to differentiate their family from their siblings by taking a "dit" name that described the locale to which they had relocated (ex: since the Colonists followed the customs of the French feudal system, land was divided amongst the first born sons [primogeniture]. Soon there was not enough land to divide any further. Perhaps an adventurous younger son would decide to establish himself, with or without a family, in another area... say a fertile piece of land near some streams... he might add des ruisseaux (streams/creeks/rivulets) to distinguish himself from his brothers. When he married, or died, his name might be listed as Houde dit DesRuisseaux or Desruisseau(s).
The acquiring of a "dit" name might also be the result of a casual adoption, whereby the person wanted to honor the family who had raised them. Another reason was also to distinguish themselves by taking as a "dit" name the town or village in France from which they originated... ex: Huret dit Rochefort.
"Dit" in French means "say" and in this context, it means, "called." In other words, a person might be Pierre Bourbeau dit Lacourse, which means that he had an ancestor named Bourbeau, but he chooses to use the name Lacourse instead. So he is Pierre Bourbeau called Lacourse.
Often a dit name was taken to distinguish their family from another family of the same name living nearby or used as a . sort of nickname, often picked up during service as a soldier. It might refer to the place in France where the family originated or sometimes it was the mother's surname, and sometimes the father's first name was used, either instead of the surname (for example, Hebert dit Emmanuel). Very often the dit name was passed down to later generations, either in place of the original surname, or in addition to it.
Most of the names came about for two primary reasons:
First, most of the citizens of the 1600-1800 were illiterate. Of these, a precious few could sign their names. The priests, seminarians, missionaries, monks & nuns were the most educated groups in the citizenry. Only an elite few were educated beyond what we, today, would consider a basic elementary education. Consequently, many of the clerics and notaries, who under the French system of administration were charged with recording "vital statistics" wrote the names as they knew them to be in France, as a precious few of the immigrants/colonists signed them, or as they heard them (phonetically). That is why one sees Garau, Garrault, Gareau, Garo, etc. even amongst the sons of a particular ancestor. A good example are the descendants of Louis Houde...some of the variant spellings found are: Houd, Houle, Ould, Houde, Hood, etc.
The second reason for variant spellings is, as the colonists migrated within Nouvelle France/New France & eventually beyond the areas of French-speaking Canada (ex. to current-day USA, the Caribbean, the West Indies, etc.) recorders of "vital statistics" who were not French speakers, usually spelled names phonetically, or changed them because they didn't have a clue how to write them.
(Ex. Rochefort became Rushfort in the Carolinas, Champagne became Shampang, Thibodeaux became Thibodo, or Tibodo. LeBrun was changed to Brown & Leblanc to White, etc.etc.)
French-Canadian Surnames: Variable, Known as, Anglicizations, etc.
Lebeuf Boutet
Lebeuf Chalou
Lebeuf Chaloux
Lebeuf Fresville
Lebeuf Laflamme
Lebeuf The ox
Lebeuf Leboeuf
LebeufdeFresville Fresville
Leboeuf Boutet
Leboeuf Laflame
Leboeuf Lebeuf
Boutet Albeuf
Boutet Alboeuf
Boutet Lebeuf
Boutet Leboeuf
Boutet Lépine
Boutet Malbeuf
Boutet Saint-Martin

TIMELINE OF THOMAS LEBOEUF AND NICOLE GAZELLE:
1613 Thomas was born in Giray en Aunis, FR
1617 Nicole GAZELLE was born in Giray, Aunis, FR
1635 Daughter Catherine was born in Giray, Aunis, FR
1640 Daughter Marguerite was born in Giray, Aunis, FR
1642 The city of Montréal (at first also called Ville Marie) was founded
1643 Thomas married Nicole GAZELLE in Giray Charente, Inferie, FR
1643 Son Jacques dit Boutet born in Rochefort, in LaRochelle, province of Aunis. FR
1662 Nicole GAZELLE died in FR
1663 The colonies of Canada, Acadia, and Newfoundland were formed into the royal province of New France. Québec was made its capital
1664 Thomas died in Giray en Aunis, FR


THE CHILD WE WILL FOLLOW IS JACQUES dit BOUTET LEBEUF

JACQUES dit BOUTET LEBEUF, son of Thomas and Nicole Gazelle, was born on April 14, 1643 and Baptized the same day at Notre Dame de Giray en Aunis in Rochefort, in the city of LaRochelle, in the Province of Aunis, now the Department of Charnel Maritime on the west coast of France, Carerente-Martim, FR. He died November 28, 1696 in Batiscan, St-François-Xavier-de-Batiscan, Deschaillions, Champlain, Quebec, CN.
He left his home located near Rochefort and LaRochelle, both coastal cities in Aunis in Giray, FR, around 1664 and immigrated to Montreal. He is first recorded in Canada at age 21 on May 2, 1664 at Cap de la Madeleine on the St. Lawrence River near Trois Rivieres about half way between Quebec and Montreal.

Montreal History
In 1535 the French explorer Jacques Cartier was the first European known to land on Montreal Island
The city of Montreal (at first also called Ville Marie) was founded in May 1642 as a missionary colony. The city's founder and first governor, Paul de Chomedey, Sieur de Maisonneuve, settled along the Saint Lawrence with some 40 colonists. After difficult beginnings, the city prospered as the fur-trading center of the French colony of New France and became the gateway to the western interior. Fur traders departed from Montreal to explore and start trading posts in the Great Lakes area and the Mississippi valley. By 1760 the city's population of French origin had reached about 4000.
Quebec History
The Iroquoian village of Stadacona occupied the site of Québec when French explorer Jacques Cartier visited the area in 1535. Finding the village abandoned in 1608, fellow Frenchman Samuel de Champlain built a fur-trading post there and founded the first permanent French colony at Quebec. This was the first permanent European settlement in the region called Canada, although the French had had summer trading and fishing camps at Tadoussac and elsewhere for 50 years or more. Despite a small population, Québec became the administrative, military, and religious center of the French empire in North America, as well as a major transfer point for trade and immigration. When the colonies of Canada, Acadia, and Newfoundland were formed into the royal province of New France in 1663, Québec was made its capital.
Jacques married (1) ANNE JAVELOT a "Filles du Roi" on January 24, 1667 in Batiscan, Champlain, PQ, CN. She was born June 14, 1636 in Temple Calviniste, La Rochelle, Aunis, (Charente-Maritime), FR and died March 11, 1669 after only two years of marriage, at the age of 22 in Cap Rouge, Province of Quebec, CN. Both of Anne’s parents were deceased before she left France. She signed and annulled a marriage contract before the notary Becquet with Jean GARIGUET on August 24, 1666. She had a dowry of 200 pounds.
Children of Jacques and Anne JAVELOT were:
1. JEAN LEBEUF was born October 13, 1667 in Notre-Dame-de-Québec, Province of Quebec, CN and married Angelique GUARON in 1705 in Deschaillons, CN.
2. PHILLIPE LEBEUF was born March 10, 1669 in côte-St-Michel-Cap-Rouge, Province of Quebec, CN and died as an infant IN Quebec, CN.

Anne JAVELOT died March 11, 1669 and on October 29, 1669, Jacques married (2) Antoinette LENOIR, another "Filles du Roi", originally of Paris, in Notre-Dame-de-Québec, Province of Québec, CN. She was born in 1651 in St Eustache, Paris, FR, and died in Quebec, CN. She immigrated in 1669 to Canada. She was the daughter of Jean LENOIR and Antoinette (Siroir) Pirois who lived in St Eustache, Paris, FR.
Antoinette signed and annulled a marriage contract with the Carignan Regiment soldier Julien MEUNIER on September 29, 1669 and then married Jacques. Her dowry was 350 pounds 50 from the King. Their first child, Marie Felicite, was born and died the same day In Sillery, Quebec, CN. They had two sons that are the progenitors of many LEBOEUFs in Canada and Louisiana.
Jacques and Antoinette’s marriage was annulled on September 29, 1696 and Antoinette then married Jean dit Lajeunesse ARCOUET on July 18, 1701 at Batiscan, Quebec, CN. He was a member of the Carignan Regiment.

CHILDREN OF JACQUES LEBEUF AND ANTOINETTE SIROIS LENOIR:
1. MARIE FELICITE LEBEUF was born May 16, 1670 in Sillery, Province of Quebec, CN and died the same day.
2. PIERRE Dit BOUTET LEBEUF was born May 17, 1672 and was baptized the next day in Sillery, Province of Québec, CN and died January 25, 1749/50 in Montreal, Ile de Montreal, Quebec, Canada. He married Francoise AUZON August 27, 1695 in Montreal, CN.
3. JEAN BAPTISTE LEBEUF was born April 19, 1674 at Cap Rouge Province of Quebec CN and died April 2, 1712 in Charlesbourg, Quebec, CN. In 1681 he was with his parents in the Boucherville, Quebec census. He married MARIE THERESE dit BRUELLE BEAUFORT LIMOUSIN, April 11, 1695 in St-François-Xavier-de Batiscan, Mauricie, Quebec, PQ, CN. She was born April 04, 1680 in Champlain, Mauricie, Quebec, CN, and died Aft. 1715 in Deschallions, Lotbeniere, Quebec, CN. She was the daughter of HILAIRE LIMOUSIN and MARIE-ANTOINETTE LEFEBVRE.
JEAN BAPTISTE LEBEUF and MARIE LIMOUSIN had nine children who all stayed in Canada. One of their children was MICHEL LEBEUF who was born in 1710 and died January 02, 1859. He married MARIE-MADELEINE TESSIER on February 09, 1738/39 at St Anne-de-la-Perade QC. She was born Abt. 1697. They had ten children. Two of these children moved to another French territory in North America – “Louisiana.”

Though other LEBOEUFs may have come to the New World, Jacques was the progenitor of many of today's LEBOEUF descendants.
Jacques’ immigrating to Montreal established that he was French-Canadian. French Canadians, in genealogy, generally refer to descendants of the French who settled the Quebec area beginning in the early 17th century.
The Acadians on the other hand are descendants of the French settlers of Nova Scotia in the early 17th century. They all stayed in that local area until the British forcibly ejected them in 1755. Then they scattered all over the place, but probably the largest numbers ended up in Quebec, New England, and Louisiana. Their descendents are known as Cajuns.
The French-Canadians did not interact or intermarry very much with the Acadians, so we have two entirely separate groups for genealogical research. Most Canadians with a French name or who speak French would be considered a French-Canadian.
In Canada, the early French Canadian settlers who cleared the land and farmed it were known as habitants. They did not take kindly to being called peasants. Humble farmers and fur traders though they may be, they were still a step up from peasants and actually lived quite well in comparison to their cousins back in France.
Anne JAVELOT who married Jacques LEBOEUF on Jan. 24, 1667 and Antoinette LENOIR,
dit Pirois who married Jacques LEBOEUF on Oct. 29, 1669 after Anne’s death were both
KING'S DAUGHTERS LES FILLES DU ROI
The Filles du Roi
In the first census of the Colony of New France in 1666, there were 3,215 inhabitants. The filles du roi, or King's Daughters, were some 770 women who arrived in the colony of New France (Canada) between 1663 and 1673, under the financial sponsorship of King Louis XIV of France. Most were single French women and many were orphans. The King paid for their transportation to Canada and settlement in the colony. Some were given a royal gift of a dowry of 50 livres for their marriage to one of the many unmarried male colonists in Canada. These gifts are reflected in some of the marriage contracts entered into by the filles du roi at the time of their first marriages.
The filles du roi were part of King Louis XIV's program to promote the settlement of his colony in Canada. These women agreed to travel to the new settlements in North America and marry a settler there in exchange for a 50-pound dowry from the French King. Of the nearly 1000 women who undertook the journey, about 800 made it to Canada. and the resultant population explosion gave rise to the success of the colony. Most of the millions of people of French Canadian descent today, both in Quebec and the rest of Canada and all of North America, are descendants of one or more of these courageous women of the 17th century.
They made contracts of marriage with the men who had originally settled the New World and usually married within a few days or weeks of the contract signing. Often the women broke the contracts, only to remake them or make new contracts with other men. In many cases, the girls married soldiers of the famous Carignan Regiment.
There was a poet who by influencing public opinion cast a dark shadow over the role of those young women who known as the King's Daughters Les Filles du Roi. These women actually came to New France as pioneers to an unknown world where the waters had not yet been charted. This poet, with the sway of public opinion, claimed these young women were "comfort women" for the soldiers and first pioneers who had come to people a new country. Nothing could have been further from the truth! There were witnesses to the arrival and marriages of these women who affirmed the very high moral standards of these pioneering women. These same witnesses rejected all allegations of improprieties on the part of these women.
The truth of the matter regarding these women is that thanks to their tenacity and to their courage - inherited from their ancestors - the "King's Daughters" are truly the mothers of the French Canadian descendants. They assured the survival and the preservation of a moral and cultural and religious heritage. We should all be proud of the contribution these women made, as they stood steadfast beside their counterparts to found a new country, a new world that would allow us to touch the fibers of their lives and that would help us to know the rich French heritage of which we are all daughters and sons.

The Carignan-Salières Regiment
The pleas of the colonists of New France for assistance in their struggle with the Iroquois were answered in 1665 with the arrival of the first French regular troops in Canada, the Carignan-Salières Regiment. Between June and September 1665, some 1200 soldiers and their officers arrived in Quebec, under the leadership of Lt. General Alexander de Prouville, Sieur de Tracy.
The series of forts established by the Regiment along the Richelieu River, along with the success of its second campaign into the land of the Mohawk Indians, led to a long period of peace for the colony, which permitted it to prosper. However, King Louis XIV's plan included the permanent settlement of many of the soldiers and officers in Canada. Over 450 of these troops remained in the colony, many of whom married the newly arrived filles du roi.
Most persons of French Canadian descent can claim one or more of these brave soldiers as ancestors. In addition to the list of soldiers and officers on the official "roll" of the Regiment, there were many others who participated in the successful campaign against the Iroquois, including many militiamen who resided in the colony but whose names were not recorded for posterity. We honor all these 17th century men who paved the way for growth and prosperity of New France.

TIMELINE OF JACQUES DIT BOUTET LEBEUF AND MARIE ANTOINETTE LENOIR:
1636 Anne JAVELOT born in LaRochelle, Aunis, FR
1642 City of Montreal was founded as a missionary colony
1643 Jacques dit Boutet, son of Thomas and Nicole, was born and baptized in LaRochelle, FR
1651 Antoinette LENOIR dit Sirous born in St. Eustache, Paris, FR
1663 Quebec was made the capital of the province of New France
1664 Jacques dit Boutet moved from Giray, FR to Montreal CN
1664 Jacques was first recorded in Canada at age 21 near Trois Riveras
1667 Jacques married (1) Anne JAVELOT in Quebec, CN
1667 Son Jean, son of Jacques and Anne JAVELOT, was born in Quebec, CN.
1669 Son Phillipe, son of Jacques and Anne JAVELOT, was born in Cap Rouge, PQuebec, CN and died as an infant. 1669 Anne JAVELOT died in Cap Rouge, Province of Quebec, CN
1668 Antoinette LENOIR emigrated to Canada from France
1669 Antoinette signed and annulled marriage contract with Julien Meunier
1669 Jacques married (2) Antoinette LENOIR dit Sirous in Notre Dame de Quebec, CN
1669 Daughter Marie Felicite LEBEUF was born in Sillery, Quebec, CN and died in 1670.
1672 Son Pierre Dit Boutet LEBEUF was born in Sillery, Quebec, CN.
1674 Son Jean Baptiste LEBEUF born at Cap Rouge, Province of Quebec, CN
1681 Jacques was listed in Boucherville, Quebec, CN Census
1696 Antionette signed and annulled marriage to Jacques
1696 Jacques dit Boutet died in Batiscan, Quebec, CN

THE CHILD WE WILL FOLLOW IS PIERRE Dit BOUTET LEBEUF

PIERRE dit BOUTET LEBEUF, son of Jacques dit Boutet LeBeuf and Antoinette Lenoir, was born May 17, 1672 in Sillery, Quebec, CN, and was baptized the next day in Sillery. He died January 25, 1750 in Montreal General Hospital, Ile de Montreal, Quebec, Canada. He married MARIE FRANCOISE (LEBLON) AUZON August 28, 1695 in Notre-Dame, Montréal, Québec, CA. She was born March 20, 1675/76 in Trois Rivieres, Moren, Quebec, Canada and died June 15, 1758 in Trois Rivieres, Quebec, CN. She was the daughter of PIERRE JEAN AUZON and CATHERINE ISABELLE MARTIN.
Trois-Rivières (Three Rivers), is Saint-Maurice County, southern Québec province, Canada, at the confluence of the Saint-Maurice and Saint Lawrence rivers. It is one of the oldest settlements in Canada, established in 1634 by the French under the direction of the explorer Samuel de Champlain at a site previously occupied by an Algonquian stockade. It grew as a port and fur-trading center during the 19th century and was incorporated in 1857.
Children of PIERRE LEBEUF and MARIE AUZON are:
1. FRANCOISE LEBOEUF was born June 10, 1697 in Montreal, Quebec, CN. She married Michel VAUDRY in Montreal on December 26, 1718. He was born June 17, 1696 at Pointe aux Tremble, CN.
2. PIERRE LEBOEUF, JR was born September 27, 1698 in Montreal, CN and died November 3, 1714 in Montreal, Quebec, CN.
3. GENEVIEVE was born February 25, 1703 in Champlain, Montreal, Quebec, CN and died in 1703 as an infant.
4. MARIE JOSEPH LEBOEUF was born June 20, 1704 in Montreal, CN and died November 7, 1767 in Detroit, Wayne Co., MI. She married (1) Peter Guignard dit St. Etienne and on August 11,1729 she married (2) Pierre RIGMAN.
5. PIERRE RENE LEBOEUF was born July 13, 1706 in Montreal, CN and died October 7, 1785. He married Marie Francoise HAINS on November 16, 1729 in Quebec.
6. LOUIS LEBOEUF was born September 21, 1708 in Montreal, Quebec, CN and died about 1709.
7. MARIE ANGELIQUE LEBOEUF was born October 19, 1710 in Montreal, CN. She married Paul Phillipe LARCHEVEQUE on August 27, 1731 and married (2) Jean MILTON on January 29, 1748.
8. CHARLES-HYACINTHE LEBOEUF was born August 12, 1712 in Moren, Montreal, CN and died about 1770.
9. FRANCOISE LEBOEUF was born January 26, 1715 IN Montreal, Quebec, CN and died January 26, 1715.
10. FRANCOIS DOMINQUE LEBOEUF was born December 17, 1719 in Montreal, CN and died October 02, 1796 in Cabonocey, St James Parish, LA. He is buried in St James Church of Santiago de Carbonocey. In 1745, France was trying to colonize their fairly new Louisiana holdings and since Francoise Dominique and his brother Charles Hyacinthe were the youngest in the family and thus least likely to inherit land, they immigrated to Louisiana.

TIMELINE OF PIERRE DIT BOUTET LEBEUF AND MARIE FRANCOISE AUZON:
1672 Pierre dit Boutet LEBEUF was born in Sillery Quebec, CN
1675 Marie Francoise AUZON born in Trois Rivieres, Moren Quebec, CN
1695 Pierre married Marie Francoise AUZON in Notre-Dame Montreal, CN
1697 Daughter François born in Montreal, Quebec, CN
1698 Son Pierre LEBOEUF, Jr born in Montreal CN
1703 Daughter Genevieve born in Montreal, Quebec, CN
1704 Daughter Marie Joseph LEBOEUF born in Montreal, CN
1706 Son Pierre Rene LEBOEUF born in Montreal, CN
1708 Son Louis LEBOEUF born in Montreal, CN and died about 1709
1710 Daughter Marie Angelique LEBOEUF born in Montreal, CN
1712 Son Charles-Hyacinthe LEBOEUF born in Moren, Montreal, CN
1715 Son Francoise LEBOEUF born and died about 1715 in Montreal, CN
1719 Son Francois Dominique LEBOEUF born in Montreal, CN
1744 Pierre dit Boutet LEBEUF died in Montreal, Quebec, CN
1758 Marie Francoise AUZON died in Trois Rivieres, Moren Quebec, CN


THE CHILD WE WILL FOLLOW IS FRANCOIS DOMINQUE

LEBOEUF FRANCOIS DOMINQUE LEBOEUF, son of Pierre dit Boutet and Marie Franscoise Auzon, was born December 17, 1719 in Montreal, Quebec, CN, and died November 02, 1796 in St James Parish, LA. He was buried in St James Church of Santiago of Cabonocey, St James Parish, LA.
Some of the first LEBOEUFs arriving in Louisiana were Pierre's sons Francois Dominque and Charles Hyacinthe who left Canada and settled on the “First German Coast”, St Charles Parish, LA about 1745.
At that time, the French government in Paris was trying to colonize the new Louisiana holdings and encouraged migration from Canada. Since Francoise Dominique and Charles Hyacinthe were the youngest in the family and thus least likely to inherit land in Canada, they immigrated to Louisiana. This was about ten years prior to the 1755 displacement by the British of Acadians from Nova Scotia.
In 1608 the explorer, Samuel de Champlain, founded the first permanent French colony at Quebec. It was not until sixty years later that the French began to expand south. In 1673 Jacques Marquette and Luis Joliet explored the central portion of the Mississippi River. They were followed by Robert Cavalier de LaSalle who sailed down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico and claimed the entire territory for France. He named the territory Louisiana in honor of King Louis XIV.
The French established settlements in what it called New France. The largest colonies were in the lower Mississippi Valley where the fertile soil and warm climate enabled the settlers to establish successful farms and plantations. New Orleans, founded in 1718, became a busy seaport and trading center.
French immigration to Louisiana was restricted to Roman Catholics and so French Protestants (Huguenots) who wanted to live in America tended to settle in English colonies. As a result of the work of French missionaries and priests, the Catholic Church became well established in the Mississippi Valley.
By the middle of the 18th century the population of New France was 80,000. This was scattered over a wide area whereas the English population of 1,500,000 was concentrated in thirteen colonies along the Atlantic seaboard
In 1754 war broke out between the French and English settlers.
Under the terms of the Treaty of Paris (1763), Spain received St. Louis, New Orleans, and the Louisiana Territory west of the Mississippi. In 1803 it was returned to France and three years later it was sold to the United States.
On the outbreak of the Civil War the French community were keen to show its support of the Union. The Lafayette Guards, an entirely French company, was led by Colonel Regis de Trobriand.
The dominant regional culture of South Louisiana results from successive waves of French (Canadian traders, Acadians from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick).
Many people think of South Louisiana as "Cajun," the term being a local version of "Acadian." Today's Cajun culture resulted from the blending of several groups, primarily the Acadians, the descendants of French Acadians who were expelled from Nova Scotia by the British in 1755 and who began arriving in Louisiana in 1765.
A large number of Germans arrived during the Spanish period, settled upriver from New Orleans along the German Coast, and provided most of the vegetable crops needed by New Orleans. Living in relative isolation on the Louisiana bayous and the southwest Louisiana prairie and being the dominant cultural group, the French-speaking Acadians, French nationals, French royalists, and French army officers absorbed Germans, Spanish, British Americans, and Native Americans who settled among them or married into their families.

The German Coast , also known as Cote de Allemands, was a region of early Louisiana settlement located above New Orleans on the Mississippi River — specifically, in St. John the Baptist and St. Charles parishes of present-day Acadiana. It was so called because of its large population of German pioneers, who in 1768 joined with Acadians from the Cabannocé Post area to march on New Orleans and overthrow Spanish colonial governor Antonio de Ulloa. Later the Germans and Acadians united again, this time under Spanish colonial governor Bernardo de Gálvez, to fight the British during the American Revolution. Most of these German Coast settlers hailed from the Rhineland region of Germany and the German-speaking cantons of Switzerland Some settled beyond the German Coast, particularly along Bayou Lafourche, and at other places today bearing their name, Bayou des Allemands and Lake des Allemands ("Germans Bayou" and "Germans Lake," in French). Eventually, these Germans intermarried with the Acadians and their descendants, began to speak French, and were transformed along with the Acadians and other frontier settlers into the Cajun population. Many modern-day Cajuns bear surnames of German origin, such as BOURG, Folse, HIMEL, Schexnider, Stelly, and Toups.
The parish of St. Charles is one of the best in the state. The alluvial lands along either side of the Mississippi furnish the almost entire cultivable lands of the parish. These lands are have the very richest and yield immense crops of cane and rice. The territory comprising the parishes of St. Charles and St. John was among the first settled in Louisiana. In 1722, 250 Germans from Alsace-Lorraine immigrated to Louisiana under the direct auspices of the famous “Mississippi Company” or the “Company of the Indies’. They took possession of the territory embraced in the parishes under the colony name of the "German Coast. The population of the German Coast was augmented in 1766 by the immigration of 216 Acadians, who settled on both sides of the river as far up as Baton Rouge. Nearly the whole of the white population of these parishes consists of the descendants of these early German and Acadian settlers. The seat of parish government was established where it still remains, on account of its central location, being situated near the exact center of the parish, on or near the west bank of the Mississippi river. It has always been known as St. Charles courthouse, notwithstanding the fact that the town of Hahnville is in close proximity and is considered the parish town. St. Charles parish was formed in 1807. Among the whites the Catholic religion has a decided prestige. In fact it is largely hereditary. The first church built in the parish was Catholic, and is said to be about the third oldest in the state, having been established during the early days of the "German Coast," under the old French regime. The church still exists, new structures having been erected on the old site. The name of old red church is still retained.
On June 14, 1748 Francois Dominique borrowed 800 livres from MARIE MAGDELAINE SCHMIDT ANDRE the widow of Canadian Antoine Joseph ANDRE who was a locksmith in Houma, who died December 31, 1747 in Edgard, German Coast, LA. She agreed to allow Francois to work in the locksmith shop of her late husband
A few months later, on July 29, 1748, Francois married Marie in the St. Charles Borromeo Church (Little Red Church) in Destrehan. Marie Magdelaine was born October 01, 1713 in Esslingen, GER, and died November 02, 1796 in Edgard. She was the daughter of Johann Adam SCHMIDT and Anna Marie MEYER from Germany.
MARIE MADELEINE SCHMIDT ANDRE and Antoine Joseph ANDRE had been married at least seven years and by whom she had four children:
Francois acquired 30 arpents (1 arpent= 7/8 of an acre) of land on the left (east) bank in what is now the Bonnel Carre Spillway. Then, as now, the land was flooded often by rises in the Mississippi River. He abandoned that land and acquired new land on the right (west) bank. On April 9, 1770, in the company of his step son-in-law Michel Arsenault, he acquired for his sons (then 21, 19, & 18) 9.5 arpents of land on the west bank adjacent to his own land. According to a census in 1763 (Voorhies 1973, 82), Francois Dominique had 2 ox, 6 cows, and 8 arpents of land nearby.
He settled along the Mississippi River in St. John the Baptist parish, where they set up farming operations. Records of their dealings can be found in the parish. Francois Dominique's family remained along the Mississippi River. The 1766 census lists Francois Dominique as having five sons (but doesn't name them).
During the early 1760’s Marie Ann ANDERE and Michael ARCENEAUX (daughter and son-in-law of Marie Magdelaine) were in St. John the Baptist Parish. In the early 1770’s Francois Dominique and Marie moved from St. Charles Parish to St. John the Baptist Parish to be near Marie Ann and Michael. In the 1780s Francois
Dominique's family moved to St. James parish. His sons started their families on land near present-day Vacherie.
When they came to St. James, Francois Dominique and sons Pierre Charles, Jean Francois and Charles became landowners on what had been the 1755 land grant to Louis RANSON, the Vacherie of Ranson (between Oak Allee and New Vacherie Road). After they left the Vacherie area they become landowners in the Welcome and Hymel areas. Francois Dominique was shown in the 1810 census of St. James Parish.
Francois Dominique LEBOEUF had a land sale recorded 9-22-1781. At age 65 he fell from a tree and landed on his head and died.
St. Charles and St. John Parishes just above New Orleans on the Mississippi River are known as the German Coast because of the large number of German immigrants who settled there during the early 1700’s.
CHILDREN OF FRANCOIS DOMINIC LEBOEUF AND MARIE SCHMIDT:
1. DOMINIQUE LEBOEUF was born Abt. 1748.
2. PIERRE CHARLES LEBOEUF was born March 30, 1749 in Edgard, St John the Baptist Parish, LA and died September 05, 1795 in Carbonocey, Edgard, St John the Baptist Parish, LA. He was buried in Destrehan, St. Charles, LA. He married MARIE MAGDELEINE (HYMEL) HIMEL June 10, 1776 in German Coast, St John the Baptist Parish, LA. She was born March 10, 1760 in Edgard, St John the Baptist Parish, LA and died July 08, 1818, St. James Parish, LA.
3. FRANCOIS JEAN JACQUES LEBOEUF, was born December 14, 1750, Edgard, German Coast, LA and died April 14, 1822 in Terrebonne, LA. He was baptized at St. Charles Borromeo Church, known as The Red Church in Destrehan.
On October 27, 1780 he married Marie Magdaline FREDERICK. She was born about 1750 and died before 1782. They had a daughter Marie Madeleine who was born in August 1781 in St James Parish, LA
In 1782 he married (2) Marie Reine MATHERNE in St. John the Baptist Church (the same church she had been baptized in 1766). She was the daughter of Nicolas MATHERNE and Regine ROME.
They had seven children: Marie Magdelaine 8-19-1781, Jean Jacques 1782, Marguerite 1786, Marie Reine 2-2-1787, Suzanne 10-12-1787, Marie Eleanore 6-17-1791 and Joseph Gabriel 7-23-1793. Marie Reine was baptized at St. John Church in Edgard and the last three children were baptized in St. James Church, known as the Cantrelle Church, on the west bank.
Francois Jean Jacques and Marie Reine with their family moved to the Thibodaux area on Bayou Lafourche. The census of 1810 shows Jean as the owner of land, now part of the Reinzi Plantation, on Bayou Lafourche, two slaves, one horse, and a corn mill. He died at age 61 on October 4, 1811 in Houma.
4. CHARLOTTE-LOUISE LEBOEUF, was born January 07, 1753 in Destrehan, St. Charles, LA; died October 11, 1759 in Cabonocey , St. James, LA..
5. CHARLES LEBOEUF, was born October 14, 1754 in Destrehan, St. Charles, LA.


Grandparents: MICHEL AUGUSTIN LEBOEUF married (2) MARIE BOURG on February 09, 1805 in St Michael Church in Convent, LA.

5th Great-Grandfather Michel LEBOEUF, grandson of Francois Dominic and Marie Madeleine SCHMIDT, was French-Canadian but 5th Great-Grandmother Marie BOURG, daughter of Pierre Pedro MARTIN BOURG and Anastasie CORMIER, was Acadian, bringing the Acadian or Cajun lineage into the heretofore French family.

Most, if not all, of the LEBOEUFs in south Louisiana descend from Francois Dominique. His brother, Charles Hyancinthe, also married in St. Charles Parish, and had six children, but Charles Hyacinthe moved his family to the Ouachita Concession in north Louisiana near present day Monroe, LA. His descendants are scattered in Louisiana and Arkansas.

Although the LEBOEUF name is not Acadian, most LEBOEUFs have Acadian bloodlines and many Louisiana LEBOEUFs consider themselves Cajun. Most of Francois Dominique's descendants married into Acadian-Cajun families and have inhabited south Louisiana for generations.

Pre-1764 Louisiana Louisiana been inhabited by Europeans since the beginning of the 18th century. But up until the time of the Acadian settlement, most of the population consisted of the military and people looking to make money off of the territory. The only real attempt at placing settlers was the group of Germans on the Mississippi River above New Orleans (the German Coast). Most of the population was made up of French and French-Canadians. Though they didn't know it when the first Acadians headed for Louisiana, they would be arriving in Spanish territory.
The First Acadians in New Acadia: 1764-1784 Once the Treaty of Parish was completed, Acadians were on the move. Those in the American colonies and held at Nova Scotia made their way to Louisiana, with most of those who came arriving in 1765 to 1768. They settled in the west (Attakapas/Opelousas) of the Atchafalaya and along the Mississippi River (Acadian Coast).
The Seven Ships of 1785 The largest single group of immigrants in 18th century Louisiana came in 1785, when Spain paid to carry about 1600 Acadians from France to Louisiana. Most of this group settled along Bayou Lafourche.
The Acadians Become Established in Louisiana: 1786-1800 After 1785, the Acadian migration to Louisiana was essentially over. They set about to adapt to their new surroundings. Taking what they knew, and mixing it with their new climate and ideas from their neighbors, they were able to fit in and succeed in their new environment.
Other Nationalities in Louisiana The Acadians, though the major population in south-central Louisiana for some time, found themselves surrounded by other nationalities. The blending of elements of these other cultures eventually formed the Cajun culture.

The Parishes
St James, St John the Baptist, St Charles Parishes
The German and Acadian Coasts are not "coasts" as one would think of the term today as land along the seashore of an ocean. A coast by definition is "the land near the shore" but in this case, the shore is the land along the Mississippi River. During the 18th and 19th centuries the term coast was used to describe the distinct settlements situated just above New Orleans along the Mississippi River's edge. There are naturally two coasts. The left coast or left bank was the land located on your left-hand side if traveling down river (the east bank) and the right coast or right bank was the land located on your right-hand side if traveling down river (the west bank).
They are known as the German and Acadian Coasts for the first European settlers to establish along their shores. The "First German Coast" was located in current day St. Charles Parish along the west bank of the river between the current day communities of Killona and Taft, settled by Germans as early as the 1720s. As the settlement eventually grew, others began to settle further up river in present day St. John the Baptist Parish, near Edgard, thus the west bank of today's St. John the Baptist Parish became known as the "Second German Coast." Over the years, St. Charles and St. John the Baptist Parish collectively became known as the "German Coast."
The "First Acadian Coast" was established along the Mississippi River in St. James Parish near the St. James Catholic Church. The "Second Acadian Coast" was founded further up river in today's Ascension Parish. Thus St. James and part of Ascension made up the "Acadian Coast."
St. John the Baptist Parish was the second permanent settlement in Louisiana and established in the early 1720's by a group of Germans, hence becoming known as "La Cote des Allemands" or "The German Coast".
The Lower Delta of the Mississippi, over millions of years, has deposited much sediment to form most of current southeast Louisiana. Along the banks of the river, this sediment formed natural levees, an average elevation of about 10 feet above sea level. The land behind the levee would gradually slope from anywhere from ½ to 2 miles into the cypress swamps where the elevation was only a few inches above sea level. Each spring, the river would often overflow its banks and in most cases a crevasse would form, where the natural levee would break inundating the land with a fresh deposit of fertile sediment. This process provided the Lower Delta with some of the richest, most fertile land in the world. This process also caused problems for settlers who in the 18th century attempted to permanently establish their homes here.
These settlers attempted to protect themselves from the crevasses and flooding of the river by improving the levees and building man-made levees (known elsewhere as dikes). In dividing the land for settlement, the colonial government officials employed the French long-lot system, whereby each landowner, was given a parcel with a narrow river frontage. The parcels would then extend parallel to each other and perpendicular from the river back towards the swamps. Each landowner was required to maintain the portion of the levee on their property, and they even owned the land between the river and the levee, known as the batture.
Today, one will seldom hear the terms "German" or "Acadian Coasts" in conversation or used to describe the parishes of St. Charles, St. James or St. John the Baptist.
St James parish has an area of 308 square miles. Of this 253 square miles are alluvial (soil, sand, gravel, or similar material deposited by running water) and fifty-five, chiefly in the southeastern portion, sea marsh and marsh prairie. They are chiefly utilized in the culture of sugar cane and rice.
In the crop year of 1889-90 there was cultivated, in cane 12,350 acres; rice, 9,756 acres; corn, 9,330 acres; potatoes, 300 acres. The products of that year were, hogsheads of sugar, 23,465; barrels of molasses, 21,270; barrels of rice, 101,340; bushels corn, 166,340; bushels of potatoes, 2,500. There are in the parish, according to the assessor's report, 45,110 acres of open land, which is stated to have an average value of $25 per acre, while 105,198 acres of timberlands are given a value of $1 per acre.
The first settlement by the Acadians was made about 1762. The colony, embracing what are now St. James and Ascension parishes, they were named in memory of their former loved home, the county of Acadia. The parish of St. James was incorporated 1807 and regularly organized.
Convent, the parish seat, is a small town on the left bank of the Mississippi river. St. James on the right bank of the river, just opposite Convent, is one of the oldest settlements of the parish. It was formerly the parish seat. The St. James Catholic Church, the first established in the parish, formerly known as the Cantrella church.
The Convent of the Sacred Heart was founded in 1825 by a colony of French nuns under the superiority of Mother Duchesne, at a point one-half mile distant from the present site. The present spacious building were erected 1845.

TIMELINE OF FRANCOIS DOMINQUE LEBOEUF AND MARIE MADELEINE SCHMIDT:
1682 LaSalle's expedition from Quebec arrived at the mouth of the Mississippi, where LaSalle erected a cross and takes possession of the country, naming it Louisiana in honor of Louis XIV.
1713 Marie Madeline SCHMIDT born in Esslinger, GER
1719 Francois Dominique LEBOEUF born in Montreal, CN
1745 Francois and his older brother Charles Hyacinthe left Canada and immigrated to Louisiana.
1745 The French Government was trying to colonize Louisiana and was encouraging migration from Canada
1747 Son Jean Jacques LEBOEUF born
1748 Francois borrowed 800 livres from Marie Madeleine SCHMIDT ANDRE, widow of Antoine ANDRE
1748 Francois married Marie Madeline SCHMIDT ANDRE in the “Little Red Church”, St. Charles Borromeo Church in Destrehan
1748 Son Dominique LEBOEUF born
1749 Son Pierre Charles LEBOEUF born in Edgard, St John the Baptist Parish, LA Destrehan, St. Charles, LA
1750 Son Francois Jean LEBOEUF born in Edgard, German Coast, LA
1753 Daughter Charlotte-Louise LEBOEUF born
1754 Son Charles LEBOEUF born in Destrehan, St. Charles, LA
1755 British displaced Acadians from Nova Scotia
1759 Daughter Charlotte died in Carbonocey, St James Parish
1760 Son Francois was born March 10, 1760 in Edgard, St John the Baptist Parish, LA
1761 Jacques Villere (Governor 1816-1820) is born in the German Coast, probably St. John the Baptist Parish.
1763 Census says Francois had 2 ox, 6 cows and 8 arpents of land on the west side of the Mississippi River
1764 The first Acadian immigrants to Louisiana, four families, arrived from New York.
1765 Acadians began arriving in Louisiana
1766 St John the Baptist Census lists Francois as having 5 sons (did not list their names)
1770 Pierre with his step son-in-law Michel Arsenault acquired 9.5 arpents of land adjacent to his own on the west bank
1770 Francois Dominique moved from St Charles Parish to St John the Baptist Parish
1776 Pierre married MARIE MAGDELEINE (HYMEL) HIMEL in German Coast, St John the Baptist Parish, LA
1781 Pierre had a land sale recorded in Louisiana
1793 Pope Pius VI established the Diocese of Louisiana, the second Catholic diocese in the United States.
1795 Son Pierre died 1795 in Edgard, Carbonocey, St John the Baptist Parish, LA
1796 Marie Madeline SCHMIDT died in Edgard, German Coast, LA
1796 Francois Dominique LEBOEUF died in Cabonocey, St James Parish, LA (he fell from a tree and landed on his head and died.
1803 James Monroe and Robert Livingston concluded the United States purchase of Louisiana from France for about 15 million.
1805 The original "counties" of Acadia, Attakapas, Rapides, Pointe Coupee, Ouachita, Orleans, Natchitoches, Lafourche, Concordia, Iberville, the German Coast, and Opelousas are created by the General Assembly.
1807 The Territory of Orleans was divided into twelve counties then into nineteen parishes
1810 Francois Dominique shown in 1810 census of St. James Parish, LA
1812 Louisiana was formally admitted to the Union as its 18th state.
1818 Francois died July 08, 1818, St. James Parish, LA


THE CHILD WE WILL FOLLOW IS PIERRE CHARLES LEBOEUF


PIERRE CHARLES LEBOEUF, son of Francois Dominique and Marie Madeleine Schmidt, was born March 30, 1749 in Edgard, St John the Baptist Parish, LA and died September 05, 1795 in Edgard, St John the Baptist Parish, LA. He was buried in Destrehan, St. Charles, LA. He married MARIE MAGDELEINE (HYMEL) HIMEL on June 10, 1776 in German Coast, St John the Baptist Parish, LA. She was born March 10, 1760 in Edgard, St John the Baptist Parish, LA, and died July 08, 1818 in St. James Parish, LA.
She was the daughter of DAVID HIMEL and MARIE BUORGEOIS.
“In the General Census of the Inhabitants who are established in the Environs of the Parish of St James at Cabahonnocer on Both Sides of the River of January 1, 1777, it shows former German Coast natives Pierre LEBOEUF and Magdelaine HIMEL. They were joined within a few years by other relatives and natives from te German Coast parishes of St Charles and St John the Baptist, resulting in a mingling of some Acadians and many German Coast natives in the area between the Old Vacherie Road to a point just above Oak Alley.
The Acadians, Joseph Bourg being one of them, were listed as members of the militia of the Acadian Coast on January 23, 1770, while those German Coast natives were not.
In the 1780s, Pierre with his father, Francois Dominique and his brothers Francois Jean and Charles moved to St. James parish where they became landowners on what had been the 1755 land grant to Louis Ranson, the Vacherie of Ranson (between Oak Allee and New Vacherie Road).
The area along the Mississippi River 1770-1830 covered by the different census cannot be determined by the present definite parish lines, since these lines shifted during the colonial period, particularly in the area where overlapping settlement was taking place.
The 1776 census shows Pierre LeBaut 28; Magdelaine Illme, wife 16.
Children of FRANCOIS LEBOEUF and MARIE HIMEL:
1. FRANCOIS GABRIEL LEBOEUF was born in 1778 and died on October 12, 1853. He married (1) Celasie ARCENEAUX on February 12, 1805 in St. James Parish, LA. He married (2) Melanie ROME on November 28, 1816 in St. James Parish, LA. He married (3) Uranie POIRIER about 1830.
2. CATHERINE ANN LEBOEUF was born on April 12, 1779 in St James Parish, LA and died on May 11, 1841 in Houma, LA. She married Gabriel ARECNEAUX on April 4, 1796 in St James Parish, LA.
3. PIERRE CHARLES LEBOEUF was born on February 2, 1781 in St James Parish, LA and died before 1815. He was married to Marie Antonia FALGOUX.
4. CHARLES LEBOEUF was born in 1783 and died in 1812.
5. MICHEL AUGUSTIN LEBOEUF was born about 1786 in St James Parish, LA and died January 02, 1859 in St James Parish, LA.

TIMELINE OF PIERRE CHARLES LEBOEUF
1749 Pierre Charles LEBOEUF was born in Edgard, St John the Baptist Parish, LA, Destrehan, St. Charles, LA
1760 Marie was born in Edgard, St John the Baptist Parish, LA
1776 Census shows Pierre 28 and Magdalene 16
1776 Pierre married MARIE MAGDELEINE (HYMEL) HIMEL in German Coast, St John, LA.
1777 Son Francois Gabriel born
1778 Daughter Catherine Ann born in St James Parish, LA
1779 Son Pierre Charles born in St James Parish, LA
1783 Son Charles born
1786 Son MICHEL AUGUSTIN LEBOEUF was born in St James Parish, LA
1787 Daughter Suzanne born in St James Parish, LA
1789 Son Augustin born in St James Parish, LA
1791 Daughter Marie Ann born in St James Parish, LA
1795 Pierre died September 05, 1795 in Edgard, St John the Baptist Parish, LA St. James, LA.
1806 Son Moise married in St James Parish, LA
1818 Marie died in St. James Parish, LA.

THE CHILD WE WILL FOLLOW IS MICHEL AUGUSTIN LEBOEUF

MICHEL AUGUSTIN LEBOEUF, son of Pierre Charles and Marie Magdeleine Himel, was born about 1786 in St James Parish, LA and died January 02, 1859 in St James Parish, LA.
He married (1) Camelite BERNARD about 1800 in St James Parish, LA. She was born about 1786 in St James Parish, LA and died before 1805.
MICHEL married (2) MARIE BOURG on February 09, 1805 in St Michael Church in Union, LA. She was born April 5, 1791 and died Before November 27, 1815. Marie was the daughter of Pierre (Pedro) Martin BOURG and Anastasie CORMIER.
Mission Chapel of St. Michael the Archangel Hwy 44 (River Road) Union, LA 70723
Mission Established: 1831 Current Church Built: 1875 by the Marist Fathers.
Reestablished from the original St. Marie duFleuve located on Whitehall Plantation.
Statues transferred from rectory at Ancient Domain Plantation during elaborate blessing ceremony.

CHILDREN OF MICHEL LEBOEUF AND MARIE BOURG:
1. SUZANNE LEBOEUF was born February 6, 1787 in St James Parish, LA. She married (1) on September 11, 1810 Jean Baptiste CANTRELLE in St James Parish, LA and she married (2) on January 17,1818 Louis ARCENEAUX in St James Parish, LA.
2. AUGUSTIN LEBOEUF was born on August 17 1789 in St James Parish, LA and died Ocbober 6, 1818 in St James Parish. He married Marie Frederick ARCENEAUX on January 6, 1811 in St. James Parish.
3. MARIE ANN LEBOEUF was born October 19, 1791 in St James Parish, LA and died April 6, 1850 in Houma, LA She married Henri Narcisse MARCEL on June 6, 1808 in St James Parish, LA.
4. MOISE LEBOEUF was born on May 26, 1807 in St. James Parish, LA.
5. LOUISE LEBOEUF was born January 7, 1809
6. MARIE LEBOEUF was born June 11, 1813
7. FELONISE LEBOEUF was born about 1815
MICHEL LEBOEUF married (3) MARGUERITE SCHOLASTIQUE GUIDRY on November 27, 1815 in St. Michel Church, Convent, LA. She was born January 17, 1799 in St. James Parish, LA and died January 09 1846 in St James Parish, LA. She was buried January 10 1846 in St Michael Church, Convent, LA. She was the daughter of Jacques (Santiago) GUIDRY and Marie Ann BONVILLAIN.
CHILDREN OF MICHEL LEBOEUF AND MARGUERITE SCHOLASTIQUE GUIDRY:
1. MICHEL LEBOEUF was born October 16, 1815 in St James Parish, LA. He married Hortense GAUDET Daughter of Joseph and Frlicite GUIDRY) on October-30-1837
2. LACROIX THEOGENE LEBOEUF was born September 14, 1818 in St James Parish, LA.
3. MARGUERITE SCHOLASTIQUE LEBOEUF was born June 11, 1820 in St James Parish, LA. She married Evariste BLANCHARD July 02 1840 in St Michael Ch, Convent, LA, son of Pierre BLANCHARD and Francoise BERNARD He was born February 14 1814 in St James Parish, LA, and died October 26 1843 in St James Parish, LA.
4. MARIE BASILICE LEBOEUF was born September 12, 1822 in St James Parish, LA, and died (17 yrs) in September 28, 1839 in St James Parish, LA.
5. MELICERTE LEBOEUFwas born about 1824. She married Jules LAGROUR on August 23, 1847. He was the son of Honore and Elizabeth DARESBOURG)
6. MARIE ANASTASIE LEBOEUF was born July 14, 1826 in St James Parish, LA, and died(7 yrs) February 11, 1832 in St James Parish, LA.
7. MARIE MENNESPER LEBOEUF was born August 30, 1828 in St James Parish, LA.
8. MARIE ELODIE LEBOEUF was born July 25, 1830 in St James Parish, LA, and died in December 13, 1833 in St James Parish, LA.
9. MARIE ELIZABETH LEBOEUF was born November 19, 1832 in St James Parish, LA.
10. ROBERT VIDAL LEBOEUF was born in December 1834 in St James Parish, LA.
11. JACQUES HERMOGENE LEBOEUF was born May 01, 1836 in St James Parish, LA.
12. ERMOGIN LEBOEUF was born in April 1839 and died in September 22, 1839.
13. MARIE EUGENIE LEBOEUF was born September 05, 1839 in St James Parish, LA. She married Delphin H. BINETTE July 30, 1854 in St Michael Church, Convent, LA. He was the son of Jean BINETTE and Marie SOYE. He was born in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA.
14. PIERRE LEBOEUF was born Abt. 1840.
15. MARIE ANN LEBOEUF was born about 1842.
16. CATHERINE ANN LEBOEUF was born about 1843.

Michel was listed in the 1850 census in St James Parish as a farmer.

St. Michael’s is located in Convent just up river from Manresa in St James Parish. In 1869 the seat of government was changed to the left bank of the Mississippi river near the "Convent of the Sacred Heart,”. There was to be a convent just a few miles from here also, hence the name of the town. The church was enlarged in 1870. A bell inscribed "Cast in Louvaine in the name of the Catholics of Belguim for their Catholic brethren in America" hangs in the tall central bell tower. The steeple atop the bell tower blew off in 1965 during Hurricane Betsy and has not been replaced There is a very unique grotto in the back part of the church behind the altar. It is said to have been built by a slave.



TIMELINE OF MICHEL LEBOEUF AND MARIE BOURG:
1786 MICHEL LEBOEUF was born in St James Parish, LA
1786 Camelite Bernard born in St James Parish, LA
1787 Son Pierre (son of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY
1791 Daughter Marie Ann (daughter of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY)
1779 Daughter Catherine Ann (daughter of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY)
1791 Marie BOURG was born
1799 Marguerite GUIDRY was born in St. James Parish, LA
1800 Michel married (1) Camelite Bernard in St James Parish, LA
1805 Camelite Bernard died
1805 Michel married (2) MARIE BOURG in St Michael Church in Convent, LA.
1807 Son Moise LEBOEUF (son of Michel & Marie BOURG) was born in St. James Parish, LA
1809 Daughter Louise (daughter of Michel & Marie Bourg) was born
1808 Camelite Bernard was born in St James Parish, LA
1813 Daughter Marie (daughter of Michel & Marie Bourg) was born
1814 Daughter Felonise (daughter of Michel & Marie Bourg) was born
1815 Marie BOURG died
1815 Michel married (3) Marguerite GUIDRY in St. Michaels Church in Convent, LA
1815 Son Michel (son of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY) born in St. James Parish, LA
1818 Son Lacroix Theogene LEBOEUF ((son of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY) born in St James Parish, LA
1820 Daughter Marguerite Scholastique (daughter of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY) born in St James Parish, LA
1822 Daughter Marie Basilice (daughter of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY) born in St James Parish, LA
1824 Daughter Melicerte (daughter of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY) was born.
1826 Daughter Marie Anastasia (daughter of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY) born in St James Parish, LA
1828 Daughter Marie Mennesper (daughter of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY) born in St James Parish, LA
1830 Daughter Marie Elodie (daughter of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY) born in St James Parish, LA
1832 Daughter Marie Elizabeth (daughter of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY) born in St James Parish, LA
1834 Son Robert Vidal (son of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY) born in St James Parish, LA
1836 Son Jacques Hermogene (son of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY) born in St James Parish, LA
1839 Daughter Ermogin (daughter of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY) born in St James Parish, LA
1839 Daughter Marie Eugenie (daughter of Michel & Marguerite GUIDRY) born in St James Parish, LA
1840 Son Pierre born
1842 Daughter Marie Ann born
1843 Daughter Catherine Ann born
1846 Marguerite GUIDRY died in St James Parish, LA
1850 Michel listed in St James Census
1859 Michel died in St James Parish, LA.


THE CHILD WE WILL FOLLOW IS MOISE ‘MAYRE’ LEBOEUF


MOISE LEBOEUF, son of Michel Augustin and Marie Bourg, was born Abt. 1807 in St James Parish, LA and died about 1862. Moise is the French version of Moses. He married MARIE ADELAIDE CAILLOUET on March 05, 1832 in St Michael's Church, St James Parish, Convent, LA. She was the daughter of Joseph Gille CAILLOUET and Celeste Marie THIBODEAUX. She was born August 22, 1814 in Convent, LA and died June 20, 1842 in Convent, LA. She is buried in St. Michael Cemetery, Convent, LA.
Moise was listed in St James Parish in the 1850 and 1860 census as a farmer.
CHILDREN OF MOISE LEBOEUF AND MARIE CAILLOUET:
1. FLORIAN LEBOEUF was born about 1832 in Convent, LA and died (15 mos) Mar 3, 1834 in Convent, LA.
2. MARIE FLORENSTINE LEBOEUF was born. December 26, 1832, St James Parish, Convent, LA. She married HERMOGENE OUBRE, January 11, 1858, St James Parish, LA. He was born. Abt. 1832.
3. MARIE GLORESTINE was born in 1864.
4. LOUISE LEBOEUF was born. About 1835.
5. MOISE EMILE LEBOEUF was born. June 09, 1838.
6. MOISE ‘MAYRE’ LEBOEUF was born. About 1839 in Convent, LA and died before 1860.
7. MARCELIN THEOPHILE LEBOEUF was born. April 10, 1841 in Convent, LA.
8. FELONISE LEBOEUF was born. Abt. 1842.
9. JOSEPH JUSTINIEN LEBOEUF was born. April 27, 1844 in Convent, LA. Justilien likely is a variation of St. Laurent Justinien whose day is September 5.
10. MARIE FLORESTA LEBOEUF was born April 26, 1847 in Convent, LA and died May 26, 1860.

Records of Louisiana Confederate Soldier by ANDREW B. Booth Vol. 2, Le Blance - Leedom
Submitted by Jan Craven
LEBOEUF, Justinien, Pvt. (son of Moise LeBoeuf and Marie Adelaide Caillouet) Co. A, 18th La. Inf. En. Nov. 1, 1862. Camp Teche, La. Present on Roll for Jan. and Feb., 1863. On Register of Prisoners of War, dated April 27, 1863, Captured Bayou Teche, La., April 14, 1863.
Sent to New Orleans, La., to be exchanged COMPANY A. St. James Rifles (St. James Parish)
The 18th Louisiana Infantry Regiment (18th Louisiana Consolidated Infantry Regiment and Yellow Jacket Battalion) Mustered into Confederate Service on 5 October 1861 at Camp Moore, Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana
Private LEBOEUF, Justilien

The Caillouet family is of French-Canadian origin, having come to America with the early colonists. Henri Caillouet was born about 1700. He married Mauricette Emry. Their son Giles Antoine was born February 15, 1722 in Brest, France and died June 19, 1803 in Bonaventure, France. He married Marie Anne Methot May 12, 1750 in Notre Dame, Quebec, CN.
Their son, Joseph Gilles Caillouet was born August 7, 1752 in Quebec, CN (Cap Saint Ignace, Acadia) and died October 14, 1850 in Convent, LA. He was a carpenter. In early manhood he went to France where he married Elizabeth Isabel LeBlanc on November 9, 1784 in Nantez, FR. She was born in 1754 in Parish L’ Assumption, Pisiquid, Acadia and died in March, 1816 in Convent, LA. She was the daughter of Pierre LeBlanc (1716-1757) and Marguerite Gantreau (1713-1779) who were married November 18, 1737 in Grand Pre, Acadia.
Her ancestors were :
(Jean LeBlanc b.1685 and Jeanne Bourgeois married January 25, 1703, in Port Royal, Acadia;
Andre LeBlanc 1659-1743 and Marie Dugas were married about 1683 in Grand Pre, Acadia;
Daniel LeBlanc and Franscoise Gaudet married about 1650 in Port Royal, Acadia1;
Rene LeBlanc 1598)
Joseph Gilles, Elizabeth Isabel and their son Jacques (James), Sr., who was born in 1784 and baptized January 21, 1785 in Saint-Martin, Chantaney, Nantes, France and died October 2, 1860 in Thibodaux, LA, sailed to Louisiana as passengers (Family No. 39) aboard the LeBeaumont, and settled in the parish of St. James, La.
In 1835 James, Marie Caillouet’s uncle, brother of her father Joseph Gille Caillouet, moved to Lafourche parish and established a plantation known as the St. James plantation, which remained wholly in the possession of the family until 1913, when a half interest in it was sold. Many descendants held positions in the Sugar Mill on the St James Plantation.

TIMELINE OF MOISE AND MARIE CAILLOUET:
1807 Moise (son of Michel and Marie BOURG) born in St. James Parish, LA
1814 Marie CAILLOUET born in St Michaels, Convent, LA
1832 Michel married Marie CAILLOUET in St Michaels Catholic Church, St James Parish, Convent, LA
1832 Son FLORIAN FLORENSTINE was born in St James Parish, LA
1834 Daughter Marie Elizabeth was born
1838 Son MOISE EMILE was born.
1838 Daughter LOUISE was born.
1839 Son MOISE "MAYRE" was born, in LA
1841 Daughter MARCELIN THEOPHILE was born
1842 Son FELONISE was born..
1844 Son JOSEPH JUSTINIEN was born. Justilien likely is a variation of St. Laurent Justinien whose day is Sept. 5.
1847 Daughter MARIE FLORESTA was born..
1850 Moise listed in St James Parish Census
1860 Moise listed in St James Parish Census
1842 Marie Adelaide CAILLOUET died in Convent, LA
1862 Moise died (approximate)
\ By the time Moise was born the area, looking upriver toward Baton Rouge and downriver toward New Orleans, had 28 elegant mansions lining the east bank of Louisiana's Mississippi River Road, and 39 homes of equal stature faced them on the west bank.


THE CHILD WE WILL FOLLOW IS MOISE “MAYRE” LEBOEUF


MOISE "MAYRE" LEBOEUF, son of Moise and Marie Caillouet, was born about 1839 in LA, and died about 1862. He married SUZANNE (WALPY) VALPY on October 07, 1861 in St Michael Catholic Church in Convent, LA. She was born December 22, 1843 in Donaldsonville, LA and Baptized January 26, 1844 in Ascension Church in Donaldsonville, LA.
She is the daughter of EDOUARD VALPY and EUGENIE PANVEL who were married February 21, 1803 in Ascension Church in Donaldsonville, LA. Suzanne’s father, Edouard was a native of Rhode Island and died before 1861. He was the son of Richard WALPY and Susan OWENS. Suzanne’s mother, Eugenei was the daughter of Elie Panvel and Eugenie Pertuit.
Moise Mayre is listed as an overseer at a Sugar Mill in St James Parish in the 1860 Census. This was probably the St James Plantation Sugar Mill founded by his mother’s uncle James Caillouet in St James Parish.
The Global Positioning System (GPS) location is 29°59'53"N 90°45'6"W

CHILD OF MOISE LEBOEUF AND SUZANNE VALPY:
1. JOSEPH JUSTILIEN LEBOEUF was born August 04, 1862 and died January 3, 1924 in Baton Rouge, LA.

TIMELINE OF MOISE “MAYRE” LEBOEUF:
1839 Moise born in LA
1843 Suzanne VALPY born in Donaldsonville, LA
1860 Moise listed as overseer at Sugar Mill in St James Parish 1860 census
1861 Moise married Suzanne VALPY
1862 Son Joseph Justilien born
1862 Moise “Mayre” died

Louisiana Civil War Soldiers Index listed:
Moise LeBoeuf vt. 5th Field Batty. (Pelican Lt. Arty.) La. Arty. Pelican Regiment, Louisiana Infantry


THE CHILD WE WILL FOLLOW IS JOSEPH JUSTILIEN LEBOEUF


JOSEPH JUSTILIEN LEBOEUF, son of Moise Mayre and Suzanne Valpy,was born August 04, 1862 and died January 3, 1924 in Baton Rouge, LA. Joseph ran a Sugar Mill. He is buried in Roselawn Cemetery in Baton Rougs, LA. He married Regina CLOUATRE September 27, 1887 in St Mary's Catholic Church, St James Parish, Union, LA. She was born February 15, 1863 in Convent, LA and died December 22, 1935 in Baton Rouge, LA.
Witnesses were Theogene CLOUATRE; Alice CAILLOUETTE; Nathalie Gaudin; Eugenie Mire; Arthur CLOUATRE; Leonce LETULLE; Joe CLOUATRE.
Regina is the daughter of Theogene Armand CLOUATRE and Victoria Marie Anne LETULLE. Her mother Victoria is the daughter of Louis Isidore Victor LETULLE & Berthilde LEGENDRE.
Regina’s mother Victoria LETULLE was born June 22, 1840 in St. James Parish, LA and died Before February 25, 1889. Victoria married Theogene Armand CLOUATRE January 12, 1857 in St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church, Convent, St. James Parish, LA. Regina’s father Theogene was born in 1834 and was the son of JEROME CLOUATRE and Emelite BOURGEOIS.
Children of Victoria LETULLE and Theogene CLOUATRE are:
1. Louis Jerome CLOUATRE was born March 24, 1858 in St. James Parish, LA and d July 11, 1927 in Baton Rough, East Baton Rouge Parish, LA.
2. Joseph CLOUAtRE was born 1860. He married Eugelie Marie HUGUET February 9, 1891. She was b. December 3, 1869 in Convent, St. James Parish, LA and d November 16, 1953 in Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, LA.
3. Regina Marie CLOUATRE was born February 15, 1863 and died December 22, 1935. She married Joseph Justilien LEBOEUF who was b. August 4, 1862 and d January 3, 1924.
4. Arthur Stanislaus CLOUATRE was born April 20, 1866 in Convent, St. James Parish, LA and d December 29, 1936 in Westwego, Jefferson Parish, LA.
5. Philomine CLOUATRE was born August 21, 1868.
6. Theogene CLOUATRE was born August 21, 3868, d September 24, 2868.

`Parish E/W Year Surname Post Office Former Occupant Plan-tation Name Remarks Apparatus in S.H. Description in S.H. Crop of 83-84
St James W 1883-84 A & F Lebeuf Welcome 230 bblsRough Rice
St James W 1883-84 Caillouet Welcome Ursin Lebeuf Sallie 571 bblsRough Rice St and Ket Wood
St James W 1883-84 Lebeuf St James 29

CHILDREN OF JOSEPH LEBOEUF AND REGINA CLOUATRE:
1. MARIE AGNES LEBOEUF was born September 08, 1888 in Convent, LA and died November 13, 1965 in Baton Rouge, LA. She is buried in Roselawn Cemetery, Baton Rouge, LA.
2. ISHMAEL JOSEPH LEBOEUF was born October 01, 1889 in St.James Parish, Union, LA and died August 29, 1948, Tulsa, OK.
3. JOSEPH WHITNEY LEBOEUF was born on April 27, 1891 in Convent, LA.
4. MARIE EUNICE LEBOEUF was born Abt. 1892. She married HUBERT BOURG.
Children of EUNICE LEBOEUF and HUBERT BOURG are: MALCOMB and MERCEDES.
5. LENA MARIE LEBOEUF was born July 5, 1895 in Convent, LA. She married Joseph Eslopenal December 15, 1930 in St Joseph's Church, New Orleans, LA. She died about 1935.
6. PEARL LEBOEUF was born February 24, 1904 in Convent, LA and died March 7, 1964 in Baton Rouge, LA. She married Carl Wilson.
7. ADELINE LEBOEUF was born November 16, 1897 in Convent. LA. She married Joseph A. Harrell on October 9, 1937 in St Agnes Church, Baton Rouge, LA.
8. JOSEPH EDWARD LEBOEUF was born December 9, 1899 in Convent, LA and died April 19, 1911 in White Castle, LA.
9. MARIE SUZANNE LEBOEUF was born June 23, 1902 in Convent, LA.

TIMELINE FOR JOSEPH JUSTILIEN LEBOEUF
1863 Joseph Justilien was born
1863 Regina CLOUATRE was born in Convent, LA
1887 Joseph married Regina CLOUATRE in St Mary’s Catholic Church, Union, LA
1888 Daughter MARIE AGNES LEBOEUF was born in Convent, LA.
1889 Son ISHMAEL JOSEPH LEBOEUF, was born in St.James Parish, Union, LA.
1891 Son JOSEPH WHITNEY LEBOEUF was born in Convent, LA.
1892 Daughter MARIE EUNICE LEBOEUF was born in Convent, LA.
1895 Daughter LENA MARIE LEBOEUF was born in Convent, LA.
1897 Daughter ADELINE LEBOEUF was born in Convent, LA
1899 Son Joseph Edward LEBOEUF was born in Convent, LA.
1902 Daughter Marie Suzanne was born in Convent, LA.
1904 Daughter PEARL LEBOEUF was born in Convent, LA..
1924 Joseph Justilien died in Baton Rouge, LA
1935 Regina CLOUATRE died in Baton Rouge, LA
1948 Son Ishmael Joseph died in Tulsa, OK
1965 Daughter MARIE AGNES LEBOEUF died in LA.



THE CHILD WE WILL FOLLOW IS ISHMAEL JOSEPH LEBOEUF


ISHMAEL JOSEPH LEBOEUF, son of Joseph Justilien and Regina Clouatre, was born October 1, 1889 in St.James Parish, Union, LA and baptized on December 23, 1889 at St. Mary Catholic Church in Union, LA. His Baptism sponsors were Joseph Melacon and Julie Melancon., He died August 29, 1948 in Tulsa, OK. He married NELL MARGARET CANADY who was born December 25, 1899 in Ponca City, OK, and died September 27, 1978 in Tulsa, OK. She was the daughter of CHARLES CANADY and FRANCES CHENEY.

According to Volume 18 of the Diocese of Baton Rouge Catholic Church Records, pg 410, the abstract of the baptism of "Joseph Ismael LEBOEUF" (son of Justilien LEBOEUF and Regina CLOUATRE) born Oct 1, 1889, baptized Dec 23, 1889 at St. Mary Catholic Church in Union, LA. His baptism sponsors were Joseph Melancon & Julie Melancon and the original records comes from [SMU-1,21].

All of the LEBOEUF children were born and died in Tulsa, OK and are buried in Calvary Catholic Cemetery in Tulsa.
Children of ISHMAEL LEBOEUF and NELL CANADY are:
1. NINA FRANCES LEBOEUF was born April 14, 1919 in Tulsa, OK and died November 21, 1994, Tulsa, OK. She married DWIGHT LATTA who was born May 22, 1916 in Tulsa, OK and died July 22, 1990, Tulsa, OK.
2. EVELYN Regina LEBOEUF was born May 25, 1920 in Tulsa, OK and died March 9, 1999 in Tulsa. She married EARL Warren NEELY who was born January 2, 1913 in Muskogee, OK and died July 15, 2001 in Tulsa, OK.
3. HELEN B. LEBOEUF was born October 13, 1921 in Tulsa and died December 1, 2001 in Tulsa, OK. She married VERNON M. COVINGTON who was born August 2, 1917 in Tulsa, OK and died July 8, 1993 in Tulsa, OK.
4. TOM LEBOEUF was born September 25, 1928 in Tulsa, OK and died July 02, 1988 in Tulsa, OK.
5. RONALD JOSEPH LEBOEUF was born June 24, 1930 in Tulsa, OK. He married MARY LOUISE HECKENKEMPER on August 30, 1952 in Tulsa, OK. She was born November 25, 1930 in Muskogee, OK.
6. RALPH EDWARD LEBOEUF was born June 24, 1930 in Tulsa, OK. He married DORIS PAYNE Abt. 1954. She was born Abt. 1932.

TIMELINE OF ISHMAEL JOSEPH AND NELL CANADY:
1889 Ishmael born in Union, St James Parish, LA
1899 Nell CANADY born in Ponca City, OK
1919 Daughter NINA FRANCES LEBOEUF was born in Tulsa, OK
1920 Daughter EVELYN LEBOEUF was born in Tulsa, OK
1921 Daughter HELEN LEBOEUF was born in Tulsa, OK
1928 Son TOM LEBOEUF, was born in Tulsa, OK
1930 Son RONALD JOSEPH LEBOEUF was born in Tulsa, OK
1930 Son RALPH EDWARD LEBOEUF was born in Tulsa, OK.
1948 Ishmael died in Tulsa, OK
1978 Nell CANADY died in Tulsa, OK



























INFORMATION SHEETS

PARISH CHURCHES - LOUISIANA
PARISH CHURCH TOWNS NAME OF AREA/NICKNAMES
St John the Baptist St John the Baptist Edgard 2nd German Coast
St Charles St Charles Borromo (Little Red) Destrehan 1ST German Coast
St James St Michael the Archangel Convent
St James St James & Cemetery Carbonocey 1st Acadian Coast Cantrelle Church
St James St Mary Union
Ascension Donaldsonville 2nd Acadian Coast
Acadia Crowley, Eunice, Branch, Rayne
Batiscan Deschallions, Champlain, Q,CN


LIST OF PLACES AND THEIR LOCATIONS
Acadia Parish Crowley, Eunice, Branch, Rayne
Ascension Parish Burnside, Darrow, Donaldsonville, Gonzales, Prairieville, Sorrento
Assumption Parish Plattenville, Napoleonville, Pierre Part
Batiscan Deschaillions, Champlain, Quebec, CN
Cap Rouge Near Quebec
Destrehan St. Charles Parish
Edgard, LA St John Parish
FIRST German Coast County Cath Church parishes of St Charles Borromeo
French Port Ouachita County, near what is now Monroe, LA
Ft Miro Monroe, LA
Giray In Province of Aunis, FR
Giray Charente, Inferie, FR
LaRochelle Coastel city In Province of Aunis, FR
Little Red Church St John Parish - Destrehan
Moren Montreal or Quebec, CN
Notre Dame de Cire d'Aunis In Rochefort, in the city of Rockefort & LaRochelle, FR, both coastal cities in Aunis, FR
Plantations mentioned Reinzi, Whitehall & Domain
Point Coupee N & W of Baton Rouge
Point Coupee Parish Livonia, New Roads
Rochefort City in LaRochelle
SECOND German Coast County Cath Church parishes of St John the Baptist
Sillery Near Quebec
St Charles Borromeo Church Destrehan, LA
St Charles Parish Hahnville, Destrehan, Luling
St Eustache Parish France
St James Parish Convent, Vacherie, Oak Alley Plantation
St John the Baptist Destrehan, St Charles, LA
St John the Baptist Parish Garybille, LaPlace, Reserve
St Mary Union, LA
St Michaels Church Convery, LA, St James Parish
Trois Riveries ½ way between Montreal & Quebec, CN
Union Parish Farmerville
German Coast - La Cote Des Alemands:
St John the Baptist Parish WEST BANK; Edgard, Lucy, Reserve, Wallace
St John the Baptist Church EAST BANK; Garyville, LaPlace, Lions, Mt Airy
St Charles Parish Hahnville, Luling, Destrehan, St Rose, Norco
Acadian Coast WEST BANK: Convent, Lucher, Grammercy
St James Parish EAST BANK: St James Church, St James
2nd Acadian Coast ASCENSION PARISH, Donaldsonville


ACADIAN-CAJUN Definition
The Acadians were French settlers in 17th-18th century Canada.
The colonization of Acadia starts just a bit before Quebec's, with the founding of Port Royal in 1605. Except for some short periods of British occupation, Acadia remained French up to 1713. Up to 1713, Acadia was made up of the present Atlantic provinces of Canada (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island then known as Ile St-Jean and some parts of Newfoundland. In 1713, a part of Acadia is definitely ceded to Britain, that is Nova Scotia with the exception of Cape Breton where was situated the fortress of Louisbourg. What corresponds to New Brunswick is claimed by both France and England, but remains under French control until 1755.
The Acadians continued to work their farms in the region until 1755, when a British governor decided to give the farms to British settlers and, in consequence, ordered the Deportation of the Acadians (le Grand Dérangement). In 1755, 7,000 Acadians are put on ships and sent to American colonies. It is estimated that half of those Acadians did not survive to exile. 10,000 others were able to run away to French Acadia but when French Forts were defeated, many of them were killed.
A LITTLE HISTORY:
Jean Prejean dit LeBreton was the first Prejean to settle in Acadia (what is now Nova Scotia). He was born in France about 1651 and died on June 6, 1733 in Port Royal, Acadia














Who were these Acadians?
The Acadians were Roman Catholic Frenchmen who had settled what is now Nova Scotia in Canada beginning in the 1630s. Just like in the English colonies, in Acadia, the French government recruited farmers, skilled laborers, soldiers, and other workers to colonize the Canadian wilderness. During the 18th century, Canada was traded back and forth between France and England several times as part of the decades of warfare waged between the two countries. Finally in the 1750s, England took permanent possession of Canada and told the Acadian settlers, who had by then been in Canada for over 120 years, that they either had to swear allegiance to the British crown or else leave the colony. Most Acadians were forcibly loaded onto ships and sent into exile. Despite their continued loyalty to the French Crown, many of the families were unable to return to their ancestors' homeland and thus remained in exile in various places around the world including Virginia, Massachusetts, England, France, and South America for some twenty years. Longfellow's poem "Evangeline" recounts the tragic separation of families and loved ones onto the ships that sailed on rough oceans. Many Acadians died on those voyages--smallpox was rampant on more than one ship--and then they had to endure several decades of near poverty while in exile. Then in the 1770s, many of these far-flung families began migrating to the Spanish but soon to be French colony of Louisiana.
Acadian-Cajun Surnames

Cajun Surnames that may be traced back to Acadia
ARCENEAUX* AUCOIN AUTHEMENT* BABIN BERGERON* BOUDREAUX
BOURG BREAUX BROUSSARD COMEAUX DAIGLE* DOIRON
DUGAS FORET GAUDET GIROIR HEBERT LANDRY
LEBLANC* MELANCON MOUTON NAQUIN PITRE RICHARD
ROBICHAUX SAVOY THERIOT* THIBODEAUX* TRAHAN VINCENT
Note: Names with an * may also be of another origin.

Here is a sampling of "Cajun" surnames that actually did not originate in Acadia.
BONVILLAIN (French) CHAUVIN (Fr.-Can.) DOMINGUE (Spanish) DUPRE (Fr.-Can.) HYMEL (German) LEBOEUF (Fr.-Can.)
LEDET (French) MARCEL (French) MATHERNEE (German) OUBRE (German) TOUPS (German) WAGUESPACK (German)
Most of these emigrants probably had minimal educations and were also Francophones in a region whose government was run first by Spanish speaking priests and officials and later by English speaking leaders. Given names often switched between French and Spanish speaking versions: Pierre and Pedro, Joseph and Joaquin, Isabelle, Isabela, Elisabeth, and Elizabeth were used interchangably even without shifts in language as were Josephe, Josefa, and Josephine. Many women were baptized some combination of Maria or Marie with another name and then when they married or died, might use simply "Marie," "Marie-Josephine," "Josephine," or even one of their other baptismal names such as Marie-Josephine "Claire." This, coupled with the fact that several daughters in a family may be named "Marie-something" caused some problems initially.
The first church in the area, St. Francis Catholic Church of Pointe Coupee was founded in 1728. Other early church parishes include St. James (in the county/parish of the same name) in 1770, Ascension of Donaldsonville in 1772, St. Gabriel in 1779, St. Bernard at Galveztown in 1779, Assumption in Plattenville in 1793, St. Joseph in Baton Rouge in 1793, New Feliciana in 1798, St. Michael in Convent in 1812.


Some FRENCH PASSENGER LISTS: Notice the familiar names, Caillouet, Bourg, Thibodeaux, etc.
The small 180 ton Le Beaumont was led by Captain Daniel and left France on June 11, 1785. They made the trip in only 69 days and arrived in Louisiana on August 19, 1785. There were 51 families (178 people) scheduled for the trip. On the way, there were 2 deaths. While in New Orleans, the group further increased by 7 (1 birth, and 6 adults) and decreased by 6 (4 died, and 2 deserted). When it came time to settle down: 41 families settled near Baton Rouge, 5 families went to the Attakapas, and 3 families chose to settled along Bayou Lafourche.
Joseph CAILLOUET, carpenter - 31 Elizabeth LEBLANC, wife - 32
Jacques CAILLOUET, son - infant
The Le Saint Remi, a 400 ton ship led by Captain Baudin, left France on Thursday, June 27, 1785. After 75 days at sea, they arrived on September 10, 1785. There were 325 people on board, along with 16 stowaways for a total of 341.families On the way, there were 15 deaths from scurvy and smallpox. While in New Orleans, the group further increased by 19 (including 8 births) and decreased by 16 deaths. When it came time to settle down: 2 families settled near Galveztown, 2 families went to the Attakapas, and 85 families chose to settled along Bayou Lafourche.
Theodore BOURG, carpenter – 39
Anne GRANGER, wife - 54
Theodore BOURG, son - 14
Anne BOURG, daughter - 19
Magdelaine BOURG, daughter – 17
Pierre BOURG, day laborer - 56 Possibly father of Pierre father of Marie
Marie NAQUIN, wife - 46
Pierre BOURG, son - 18 Possibly father of Marie would have been b. in 1767 Marie b. Abt 1786
Jeanne BOURG, daughter - 20
Victoire BOURG, daughter - 11
Blaise THIBODEAUX, carpenter - 62
Catherine DAIGLE, wife - 60
Francois THIBODEAUX, son, day laborer - 18
Joseph THIBODEAUX, son, day laborer - 17
Isabelle THIBODEAUX, daughter - 10
Joseph Nicolas HEBERT, Blaise's nephew, woodworker - 31
Firmin THIBODEAUX, sailor - 25
Marie Magdelaine THERIOT, wife - 20
Firmin Blais THIBODAUX, son - 2
Athanase BOURG, sailor - 45
Luce BRAUD, wife - 33
Joseph BOURG, son - 13
Charles BOURG, son - 10
Marie Rose BOURG, daughter - infant
Joseph Philipe HENRY, sailor - 22
Marie THIBODEAUX, wife - 32
Nicolas METRA, Marie's son - 3
Joseph METRA, Marie's son - infant
Jean THIBODEAUX, sailor - 37
Marie DUGAS, wife - 18
Jacques THIBODEAUX, his son, calker - 18
Marie THIBODEAUX, his daughter - 14
Elizabeth THIBODEAUX, widow of Jacques BOURBON - 40


The L'Amitie, a 400 ton ship led by Captain Joseph Beltremieux, left France on August 20, 1785. After 80 days at sea, they arrived on November 8, 1785. There were 270 people in 68 families on board On the way, there were 6 deaths after sickness spread through the ship (though there were no deaths once they got to New Orleans).
The number of families increased to 93 due to 24 additional adults, 10 births, and 17 marriages. When it came time to settle down: 17 families settled near Galveztown, 3 families went to the Attakapas, and 71 families chose to settled along Bayou Lafourche.
By the way, the ship was also called by its Spanish name, the La Amistad, by some.




Athanase BOURG, sailor - 45
Luce BRAUD, wife - 33
Joseph BOURG, son - 13
Charles BOURG, son – 10
Magdelaine BLANCHARD, widow of Charles BOURG - 48
Charles BOURG, son - 11
Joseph Florent BOURG, son - 7
Ignace HAMONT, quarryman - 39
Anne Joseph BOURG, wife - 37
Anne Magdelaine HAMONT, daughter - 12
Marie Modeste HAMONT, daughter - 10
Lucien BOURG, carpenter - 21
Marie TRAHAN, wife - 25
Jean BOURG, ropemaker - 25
Catherine VIAUD, wife - 33
Catherine BOURG, daughter - infant
Jean METRA, a German, day laborer - 46
Marguerite BOURG, wife - 52
Anne Marguerite METRA, daughter - 18

The La Caroline was a 200 ton ship under the command of Captain Nicolas Baudin. It left France on October 19, 1785 and made the crossing in 64 days. After the 28 families (80 people) were let off, the ship took on a load of wood and headed back to Nantes. While in New Orleans, the group had 3 births, 2 marriages, and 5 additional adults. There was also 1 death and 1 person deserted From this group, 6 families went to the Galveztown area, and 18 families went to the Lafourche area.
The La Ville d'Archangel, a large 600 ton ship, left St. Malo, France on August 12, 1785. Upon reaching Balize, an outpost at the mouth of the Mississippi River, it ran aground on November 4. This, and the fact that they had already run out of food, caused a number of passengers to get sick. Finally the ship made it to New Orleans (after 113 days at sea) on December 3, 1785.
The ship ended up with 60 familes of 299 people. The trip saw 15 deaths and 2 desertions. But there were also 7 marriage, 11 adult additions, and 2 births. This group didn't send most of its people to Lafourche. There were 53 families (271 people) who decided to go to Bayou des Ecores (near Thompson Creek, north of Baton Rouge). One family (7 people) stayed in New Orleans, while 6 families (21 people) decided to go to the Lafouche area. Of course, after a hurricane about a decade later, many of the Bayou des Ecores settlers moved south to join the other Acadians along the Lafourche.

Jean BOURG - 50
Anne DAIGLE, wife - 40
Marie BOURG, daughter - 17
Francois BOURG, son - 16
Marguerite BOURG, daughter - 15
Magdelaine BOURG, daughter - 12
Jeanne BOURG, daughter - 7
Jean BOURG, son - 6
Joseph BOURG, son - 3
Charlote Francoise BOURG, daughter - infant (b. May 26, 1785)
Jean BOURG - 40
Marie DUPUIS, wife - 36
Yves BOURG, son - 6
Jean Baptiste Simon Louis BOURG, son - infant (9 months)
Marguerite BOURG, daughter - 16
Isabelle BOURG, daughter - 12
Marie BOURG, daughter - 8
Jean LONGUESPEE - 45
Marie Francoise BOURG, wife - 40
Anne BOURG, wife - 39
Francois HENRY,son - 15
Jacques HENRY, son - 12
Barthelemy HENRY, son - 9
Marie HENRY, son - 3
Marin BOURG - 45
Marie Osithe DAIGLE - 40
Jean Pierre BOURG, son - 20
Marie Luce BOURG, daughter - 22
Marguerite Joseph BOURG, daughter - 17
Marin Joseph BOURG, son - 16
Rose Magdelaine BOURG, daughter - 13
Pierre Jean Baptiste BOURG, son - 12
Marie Francoise Magdelaine Joseph BOURG, daughter - 10
Francois George BOURG, son - 7
Guillaume Jean BOURG, son – 4
Pierre HENRY - 51
Marie Joseph BOURG, wife - 50
Jean HENRY, son - 21
Ambroise BOURG - 53
Marie Modeste MOULAISON, wife - 40
Marie Victoire BOURG, daughter - 20
Modeste Aimee BOURG, daughter - 18
Magdelaine BOURG, daughter - 16
Julie Therese BOURG, daughter - 14
Isabelle BOURG, daughter - 12
Joseph BOURG, son - 8
Pelagie BOURG, daughter - 5
Modeste BOURG, daughter - 3
Ambroise BOURG, son - 1
Joseph MELANCON - 68
Ursule HEBERT, wife - 72
Charles THIBODEAUX - 63
Magdelaine HENRY, wife - 58
Pierre Charles THIBODEAUX, son (a twin) - 20
Jeanne Tarsile THIBODEAUX, daughter (a twin) - 20
Marguerite THIBODEAUX, daughter - 22
Helene THIBODEAUX, daughter - 18
Marie Victoire THIBODEAUX, daughter - 15
Francois Xavier BOURG - 44
Marguerite Pelagie HENRY, wife - 34
Felix Xavier BOURG, son - 15
Joseph Faustin BOURG, son - 11
Marie Isabelle BOURG, daughter - 8
Maximilien BOURG, son - 6
Isabelle BOURG, daughter - 4
Pierre BOURG, son - 1
Anne Victoire BOURG, daughter - infant (b. May 14, 1785)
Charles BOURG, husband of Marguerite LEBLANC - 46
Marguerite LEBLANC - 40
Charles BOURG



INFORMATION ON CHARLES HYACINTHE LEBOEUF
In 1745, France was trying to colonize their fairly new Louisiana holdings and since Francoise Dominique and his brother Charles Hyacinthe were the youngest in the family and thus least likely to inherit land, they immigrated to Louisiana.
Charles settled along the Mississippi River in St. John the Baptist parish, LA where he set up farming operations. Records of his dealings can be found in the parish.
The 1749 Census of German Coast showed 66 people, among whom: LE BEUF, Charles was listed.
He married (1) MARGUERITE GAULOIS on February 18, 1748/49 in the Little Red Church, St. Charles Parish, German Coast, LA She was born on August 12, 1712 in Montreal, CN and died February 14, 1751 according to Little Red Church Records in St Charles Parish, apparently in childbirth, since daughter, Margueritte who married Pedro NELSON on April 22, 1796 in Natchez, MS, was baptized March 8, 1751.
Charles married (2) MARIE-ANNE MARX on January 04, 1752, at Little Red Church, St Charles, German Coast, LA. She was born about 1720 and was the daughter of Balthazar MARX and Marie Ursule EDINGER.
Church records from Little Red Church show children of Charles Hyacinthe LEBOEUF and Marianne MARX:
1. Andre: 1783 ANDRE LEBOEUF, legitimate son of Charles LEBOEUF and Marianne MARX of the German Coast, Parish of Bonnet Carre, married to Genevieve FOQUEL in Baton Rouge, legitimate daughter of Balthazar FOQUEL and Francoise BOUTON of the German Coast. They were not in the 1790 census of Ouachita post. ANDRE bought land north of Monroe about 1790. There is a second marriage record of this union in 1795 repeated by Filhiol performed at Ouachita Post:
2. Charles: Charles Hyacinthe LEBOEUF also shows up first in St Charles Parish, Little Red records,
3. Charles: 1787 Carlos LEBOEUF married Juana FOGEL, sister of the Geneveva FOGLE who married ANDRE LEBOEUF.
4. Francois: 20 Dec 1789 in St. John Parish: Francois LEBOEUF married Genevieve DUBIER. Proof that this is son of Charles Hyacinthe LEBOEUF comes 20 Sep 1795 at Natchitoches Post baptism of Eugene (son of Francois LEBEOUF & Genevieve DUBIER, residents of Fort of Ouachita), where it states that the Godparent was the child's Uncle Simon LEBOEUF (whom we know was son of Charles Hyacinthe and Marianne MARX).
5. Magdalene: 1789 Luis DESCHENE (legitimate son of Guilhaume DESCHENE and Madeleine Soucy married Magdalene LEBOEUF, Widow of Francois GOULET, and legitimate daughter of Charles LEBOEUF and Marianne BALTHAZAR at Ouachita Post. (One record shows this marriage in Pointe Coupee parish 27 May 1793.)
6. Simon: 7 Jun 1796 Simon LEBOEUF son of Charles LEBOEUF and Marianne MARX married Francoise Claire CHAVRON, daughter of Pierre CHAVRON and Magdelaine PIBOTO (daughter of Andre OLIVAN.) Among witnesses at wedding were Louis DESCHENE "groom's brother-in-law" (husband of Magdalene, above). Others: Charles Hyacinthe LEBOEUF and Marie Ann Marx probably had other children. The following births are recorded at Pointe Coupee as children of mother Marie Ann PALTZ or PALTSER or BALTHAZAR, no father shown: Jeanne LEBOEUF b. 3 Mar 1760; Perinne LEBOEUF b. 7 Nov 1770; Marie LEBOEUF b. 7 Nov 1770; Theresa LEBOEUF b. 13 Nov 1771.
Charles Hyacinthe bought some land in 1752 and was given additional land along the river by BALTHAZAR Marx (his father-in-law) the following year. In 1762 he bought a farm for 3000 livres. But things didn't work out well. He and Pierre VAUDRY bought some land from New Orleans merchants, Fournier & Saint Pé in 1769. They must have had problems paying it off, because in 1770, his brother, Francois LEBOEUF, acting as an agent for Fournier & Saint Pé, sold the land and effects.
According to a census in 1763, Charles Hyacinthe had 4 ox, 12 cows, and 21 arpents (1 arpent = 7/8 acre) of land on the Mississippi River. The 1763 Treaty of Paris ended the 7 years war, giving all French holdings east of the Mississippi River to Britain, and all French holding West of the Mississippi River to Spain. East Florida was ceded by Spain to Britain. These arrangements were not announced in Louisiana until late 1760s. Many of the French, Canadian, and German settlers opposed the takeover of Louisiana by Spain and forcefully resisted Spanish rule. The revolt (about 1768) of the citizens of Louisiana against Spain was mostly against the prohibition of trade with France. Initially Louisiana residents drove the new Spanish out but O'Reilly (a Spanish General) arrived July 24 1769 with large forces. He hanged six of the rebellious leaders. About this time (1770-71), Charles Hyacinthe LEBOEUF, who had been associated with many of the rebels along the river above New Orleans, decided to sell out in South Louisiana and move to the northern part of Louisiana on the Ouachita River. Another incentive might have been that his father-in-law, Balthalzar Marx, had died and was no longer there to farm with him, and his widowed mother-in-law had remarried.
St James Parish Legal Records:
v 29 Feb 1772. Charles Yacinte (Hyacinthe) LEBOEUF "formerly resident of St. John Parish and presently a hunter" approves action of his brother Francois LEBOEUF in matter of sale of his effects.
v In early 1770s, fearful that the Indian traders (mostly French) would incite the tribes to rebel against Spain, the Spanish Governor decreed that all traders with Indians must return to "civilization".
v Commandant at Natchitoches, Althanase de Mezieres, was ordered to clear out the vagabonds living along the Ouachita. The "vagabonds" were the Frenchmen who declined to return to "civilization.
v 24 Mar 1774 De Mezieres wrote a report of his clearing out operations to Governor Unzaga: "Your lordship having ordered me...to try to clear the Ouachita River of the vagabonds who were living on it, I have effected this removal through the Cadadoches Indians, and have arrested the persons named Andrew Oliven, his wife and daughter; Antonio La Montagne; Francisco Postillion; Pedro Champignole and Andrew Coureur, who at once obeyed your lordship's orders, and are waiting until spring, hunting in this vicinity. Likewise the person named Galier has left in a cart for Pointe Coupee to take many things, which he owes (sic) there, whose transportation was impossible by water. With respect to persons named Joseph Etier, Baudry and Jacinto (probably a Spanish rendering of Hyacinthe) LEBOEUF, with his wife and family, I have to report that they have fled with the inteniton, it is said, of going to the English shore..." (the east bank of the Mississippi.)" Note: Since these names subsequently appear frequently in the archives of the Ouachita parish courthouse, it indicates that these "vagabonds" returned to the area or had numerous relatives with the same names. In the case of Hyacinthe LEBOEUF, many of his offspring are later identified in this area:
v March 8, 1751 baptism of Margueritte (Charles Hyacinthe and Marguerite GOLOIS) godparents Francois LEBOEUF, frere du pere and Marie Apolonie FRIDERICK, spouse de Sr. NOVAREK.
v January 4, 1752 Hyacinthe Charles LEBOEUF, widower of Golois, Marguerite, married Marie Anne MARX, dau of BALTHAZAR Marx and Marie Ursule EDINGER.
The children of Charles Hyacinthe LEBOEUF and their descendents were among the earliest settlers along the Ouachita River in North Louisiana (1770s) and to South Arkansas in 1790s/1800s. We do not find any records of the father, Charles Hyacinthe LEBOEUF and his second wife, Marie Ann MARX after they were driven from the area of the Ouachita River in early 1770s. They may have remained on the English (east) shore of the Mississippi River. About the time they supposedly went there in 1776 the turbulence of the American Revolution erupted. No records of them have been found after 1773. The children were prolific and traveled extensively. Their primary base was at French Port in Ouachita County up to the 1860s, but they would marry in Bradley, Calhoun, Clark, Cleveland, Dallas, and Union Counties, Arkansas...never far from the Ouachita River. The good folks in Arkansas usually spelled their name "LABEFF".
Charles Hyacinthe LEBOEUF's co-immigrant brother did leave a final record in South Louisiana: 2 Nov 1796 Francisco Domingo LEBEUF buried St. James Church of Santiago de Cabanoce.
Charles Hyacinthe and his family left St. John's Parish by 29 Feb 1772, and he became a hunter along the Ouachita River in the area that became Ft. Miro, later Monroe, LA. He was in the Ouachita area in the 1790s. Baptisms of the children of Simon, Charles, and Andre were recorded between 1795 and 1802 at the Avoyelles Post although most of the children were born in the Ouachita area.


“The Little Red Church”, Saint Charles Borromeo, in Destrehan, LA was first constructed of logs about 1740. It burned and was rebuilt in 1806. It was a famous riverboat landmark, 25 miles from New Orleans where boat captains traditionally paid off their crews. It was in an advanced state of disrepair when Father John F. Basty arrived on the scene in 1918. It again burned and in 1921 and the current St Charles Borromeo Church was built, and the Little Red Church was demolished


ST CHARLES PARISH
St. Charles Parish, one of the original 19 parishes of the territory of Orleans, was created in 1807 from the county of the German Coast. The "Cote des Allemands" or German Coast begins 25 miles above the city of New Orleans and extends along both sides of the Mississippi River for 40 miles toward Baton Rouge. Today, this incorporates all or part of St. Charles and St. John the Baptist Parishes.
In 1720, twenty-one German families from the Rhine region of Germany settled on the West Bank of the Mississippi river. These families had suffered horribly during the Thirty Years War and subsequent French Occupation, and had fled by the thousands to the New World, enticed by promises of great wealth promoted by John Law. These original German settlers were given small plots of land by Mr. Law’s Company of the Indies, a few primitive tools, and in return found hardships in lieu of the promised great wealth.
In 1721, 330 German immigrants led by a Swedish officer named Karl Friedrich D’Arensbourg, who worked for the Company of the Indies, arrived in Louisiana. Mr. D’Arensbourg was to play a vital role in the history of the German Coast as well as that of New Orleans. In 1722, Germans from John Law’s Arkansas Concession arrived in New Orleans demanding passage to Europe. Due to a lack of ships and supplies, Louisiana Governor Bienville persuaded them to remain, and they eventually joined the other Germans along the banks of the River.
The census of 1731, approximately 10 ½ years after the establishment of the settlement, shows that there were no farm animals in the settlement. This is evidence that the first settlers endured hardships in farming, as the land which was used for farming was all cleared by hand, and done under the most primitive of conditions. In 1765 and 1766, the first Acadians arrived in the area, and they too were given land along the River, and joined the Germans in raising the fruits and produce that was used to feed the city of New Orleans
By 1792 when Destrehan Plantation became the property of Jean Noel Destrehan and his wife Marie Celeste Eleanor Robin deLogny, the German Coast contained a rich mixture of Germans, French Creoles, French Acadians and Free Blacks. During this decade, both Ormond Plantation on the East Bank, and Homeplace on the West Bank were built.
The lands along the German Coast are flat, and slope from approximately 14 feet above natural sea level at the banks of the Mississippi River, to approximately 1 foot above sea level at the shore of Lake Pontchartrain. Because the last 4 to 5 miles of land toward the lake are flat, level swampland that gives way to marsh as it approaches the lake, only 3 to 4 miles of land closest to the banks of the River was suitable for cultivation. As a result, the first serious attempts at levee building began around 1743. Though each landowner was responsible for building and maintaining levees along his property, these levees were usually only about 5 feet high and the area suffered disastrous floods almost yearly.
In 1803, Louisiana was sold to the United States in the largest peacetime land acquisition in the history of the world. For only $15 million dollars, the United States purchased most of the land from the Canadian border to the Gulf of Mexico, and straddling the continent from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains. The present boundaries of the state were set, and Louisiana was admitted to the Union in 1812.
In 1853, a major yellow fever epidemic struck New Orleans and its effects were felt along the German Coast. During this time, the priest at the Little Red Church
(so named for its red roof that served as a distance marker for watermen on their way to the Port of Orleans) was a Frenchman named Father Paret.
On the heels of the Yellow Fever Epidemic in 1861, Louisiana seceded from the Union and joined the Confederacy. During the War Between the States, St. Charles Parish was the scene of several skirmishes, but no large battles were fought in this area. By 1864, the area had two governors, one Confederate and one Federal. The Federal Governor was Michael Hahn who later founded Hahnville, now the seat of St. Charles Parish’s local government.

CHILDREN OF MARIE AND ANTOINE JOSEPH ANDRE CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 50.
1. Marie Magdelaine ANDERE was born in 1727 and died in 1797. She married Jean ROMMEL on August 6, 1774. They had nine children: Louis Andesade, Jean Adam, Adam, Jean Baptiste, Marie Josette, Helene, Charles, Marguerite and Mary Louise.
2. Marie Ann ANDERE was born about 1735 in German Coast, LA and died in 1814 and is buried in St James Cemetery, St. James, LA. She married Michael ARCENEAUX, Jr, Their children are Marie Anne, Francoise, Michel, Gabriel, Louis, Jean Baptiste and Urbain who was born June 7, 1774 in St. John Parish, LA.
3. Francois ANDRE died in 1739 and is buried in St Charles Cemetery, German Coast, LA
4. Jeanne ANDERE was born October 14, 1739 on German Coast, LA and died in 1752 and is buried in St Charles Cemetery, German Coast, LA. She married Pierre Andre MILLET.
5. Antoine Joseph ANDERE, Jr. was born December 20, 1741 and baptized in the Little Red Church. He married Francois LEGROS January 13, 1778 in St Francis Chr, Pointe Coupee,. She was born January 22, 1754 in New Orleans, LA. They had nine children born in Point Coupee.
6. Marie Joseph ANDRE was born October 25, 1743 on German Coast, LA and died in 1785 in St John Parish, LA. She married Urbain PICOU, son of Urbain Michel PICOU and Marie Joseph LARMISSEAU. Urbain died in 1792 in St John Parish, LA
7. Guillaume ANDRE was born January 11, 1746 in German Coast, LA and died and was buried in 1824 in St Francis Cemetery, Pointe Coupee, LA. He married Marguerite MAYER on August 8, 1774 St John Church in Edgard, LA
HISTORY OF ST JAMES PARISH

The Parishes

A brief history of St. James Parish
In 1805, two years after the Louisiana Purchase, "Louisiana" only consisted of the current land west of the Mississippi River and the Isle of Orleans (the land on the east bank of the Mississippi River and south of Bayou Manchac). The state was known as the Territory of Orleans and it's governing body, the Legislative Council, divided the territory into twelve counties: Acadia, Attakapas, Concordia, German Coast, Iberville, Lafourche, Natchitoches, Opelousas, Orleans, Ouachita, Pointe-Coupée, and Rapides. Acadia County included the Catholic Church parishes of St. James and Ascension of Our Lord, commonly called the first and second Acadian Coasts.
German Coast County included the Catholic Church parishes of St. Charles Borromeo and St. John the Baptist, commonly called the first and second German Coasts.
At this point, German Coast county was divided into St. Charles Parish and St. John the Baptist Parish. The courthouse was established on the west bank at Bonnet Carré Point at what would be present day Lucy. The Territory of Orleans along with the West Florida Republic became the state of Louisiana in 1812. By 1861 the current boundaries of St. John the Baptist Parish were in place. The parish seat and courthouse were moved to Edgard a few miles upriver from Bonnet Carré Point.
On March 31, 1807 the Legislative Council of the Territory of Orleans redivided the original twelve counties into nineteen parishes, based on the ecclesiastical boundaries of the period of Spanish government.
By 1861 the current boundaries of St. James Parish were in place and in 1869 the courthouse was moved to Convent on the east bank where it is located today.
The Lower Delta of the Mississippi, over millions of years, has deposited much sediment to form most of current southeast Louisiana. Along the banks of the river, this sediment formed natural levees, an average elevation of about 10 feet above sea level. The land behind the levee would gradually slope from anywhere from ½ to 2 miles into the cypress swamps where the elevation was only a few inches above sea level. Each spring, the river would often overflow its banks and in most cases a crevasse would form, where the natural levee would break inundating the land with a fresh deposit of fertile sediment. This process provided the Lower Delta with some of the richest, most fertile land in the world. This process also caused problems for settlers who in the 18th century attempted to permanently establish their homes here.
These settlers attempted to protect themselves from the crevasses and flooding of the river by improving the levees and building man-made levees (known elsewhere as dikes). In dividing the land for settlement, the colonial government officials employed the French long-lot system, whereby each landowner, was given a parcel with a narrow river frontage. The parcels would then extend parallel to each other and perpendicular from the river back towards the swamps. Each landowner was required to maintain the portion of the levee on their property, and they even owned the land between the river and the levee, known as the batture.
Today, one will seldom hear the terms "German" or "Acadian Coasts" in conversation or used to describe the parishes of St. Charles, St. James or St. John the Baptist.

St James parish has an area of 308 square miles. Of this 253 square miles are alluvial (soil, sand, gravel, or similar material deposited by running water) and fifty-five, chiefly in the southeastern portion, sea marsh and marsh prairie. They are chiefly utilized in the culture of sugar cane and rice.
In the crop year of 1889-90 there was cultivated, in cane 12,350 acres; rice, 9,756 acres; corn, 9,330 acres; potatoes, 300 acres. The products of that year were, hogsheads of sugar, 23,465; barrels of molasses, 21,270; barrels of rice, 101,340; bushels corn, 166,340; bushels of potatoes, 2,500. There are in the parish, according to the assessor's report, 45,110 acres of open land, which is stated to have an average value of $25 per acre, while 105,198 acres of timberlands are given a value of $1 per acre.
The first settlement by the Acadians was made about 1762. The colony, embracing what are now St. James and Ascension parishes, they were named in memory of their former loved home, the county of Acadia. The parish of St. James was incorporated 1807 and regularly organized.
Convent, the parish seat, is a small town on the left bank of the Mississippi river. St. James on the right bank of the river, just opposite Convent, is one of the oldest settlements of the parish. It was formerly the parish seat. The St. James Catholic Church, the first established in the parish, formerly known as the Cantrella church.
The Convent of the Sacred Heart was founded in 1825 by a colony of French nuns under the superiority of Mother Duchesne, at a point one-half mile distant from the present site. The present spacious building were erected 1845.

ST JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH

A brief history of St. John the Baptist Parish
The Jesuit fathers were the first religious order to settle in the area. The parish contains several ancient cemeteries. One of them, located in Reserve. That cemetery has been in existence since the first church was built. The church was constructed of handmade cypress lumber in the year 1722. In 1918 when their second church burned down the people of Edgard contributed $90,000 in one day to build another. This beautiful, twin-spired red brick church still stands today.
St. John the Baptist Parish was the second permanent settlement in Louisiana and established in the early 1720's by a group of Germans, hence becoming known as "La Cote des Allemands" or "The German Coast".
The area was under the French regime until 1768, when France delivered Louisiana to the Spanish. At this time the Acadians or "Cajuns" began arriving in South Louisiana after being exiled from Nova Scotia. The first Acadian settlement was established at what is now called Wallace.
In these early years, transportation was by boat, some on the Mississippi River, which was treacherous, but mainly on the many bayous and lakes. Few roads existed Observation posts were built along the river, and manned by women, who kept lookout for the few Native Americans that previously lived here.
St. John, with its fertile land being about 9 foot above sea level, proved to be excellent farmland Germans settlers grew crops that often fed early New Orleans, which would have otherwise fallen victim to famine when supply ships failed to arrive from Europe. Early St. John settlers would paddle their small boats filled with produce to sell at "The French Market" along the New Orleans riverfront.
These early settlers were devout Catholics. The Church was the centerpoint of most activities in these frail communities. Weddings, christenings and funerals were usually attended by the entire community.

St. John the Baptist is located near Brusly. The first church was erected before 1800. Both the church and the cemetery were moved to this site before the Civil War due to river changes. The current church was built to replace the older one that burned

From 1751 when the Jesuit Fathers introduced sugar, it took precedence over other industries. In 1758 Joseph DUBREUIL was the first man to erect a sugarhouse. In 1795, Etienne de Bore succeeded in making sugar from his crop. A thriving sugar industry soon became established in Louisiana, replacing the cultivation of indigo.